Make your own free website on Tripod.com
Bicha
Home
African Cichlids
American Cichlids
Anabantids
Angel Fish
Arowana
Barbs
Bettas
Bicha
Catfish/Corydora
Characins (Tetras)
Danios
Discus
Dwarf Cichlids
Goldfish
Guppies
Hatchets
Invertabrates
Killifish
Loaches
Mollies
Piranhas
Platies
Plecos
Puffers
Rainbows
Rasboras
Sharks
Suckermouth Cats
Swordtails
Miscellaneous & Uncatergorized
Experienced
Fishies
Local Stores
Set Up Ideas

Ornate Bichir

(Polypterus ornatipinnis)
Ornate Bichir
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 50 gallons
Care Level: Difficult
Tank Conditions: 77-83F; pH 6.5-7.5; KH 1-12
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 2' 1"
Color Form: Brown
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Diet:  Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Central Africa
Family: Polypteridae

The Ornate Bichir, Polypterus ornatipinnis, is considered the most attractive of the Bichir group. It is a Lobe-finned Pike, a freshwater fish found in Africa. As with other members of the primitive Polypteridae family, the Ornate Bichir has the unique ability to survive out of water. With a lung-like paired swimbladder and gills to help breathing, the Ornate Bichir can spend short periods of time on land, but must soon return to its water environment for adequate respiration.

The Ornate Bichir does best in a large "oddball" aquarium, densely planted with numerous hiding places, and a sandy bottom. This species is semi-aggressive in the fact that they will swallow any fish or invertebrate that they can fit into their mouth. Be careful in choosing passive tank mates for the Bichir, as they are very passive towards other large fish. However, they are aggressive towards their own kind, and only one should be incorporated into an aquarium, unless the aquarium is very large. Prone to jumping, a tight, well-sealed aquarium lid is required.

Eggs are deposited on clumps of vegetation; however, breeding in the hobbyist's aquarium setting is not common.

Cuvier Bichir

(Polypterus senegalus)
Cuvier Bichir
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 90 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 77-80F; pH 6.5-7.5; KH 8-12
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 1'
Color Form: Gray, Green
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Diet:  Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised
Family: Polypteridae

The Cuvier Bichir, also called the Senegal Bichir, Gray Bichir, or Dragonfin, is a member of the Polypteridae, or Lobe-Finned Pike family. This species is farm raised, but is endemic to the streams and rivers of Africa. As with other members of the primitive Polypteridae family, the Cuvier Bichir has the unique ability to survive out of water. With a lung-like paired swim bladder and gills to help breathing, the Cuvier Bichir can spend short periods of time on land, but must soon return to its water environment for adequate respiration. This species is brown in color with an elongated snakelike body.

The Cuvier Bichir does best in a large "oddball" aquarium with other large, passive fish. When provided with plenty of open swimming areas, rocks and crevices, the Cuvier Bichir is not usually aggressive toward tank mates. This species is semi-aggressive in the fact that they will swallow any fish or invertebrate that they can fit into their mouth. Be careful in choosing passive tank mates for the Bichir, as they are very passive towards other large fish. Prone to jumping, a tight, well-sealed aquarium lid is required.

A carnivore, Polypterus senegalus can be offered a varied diet of live foods such as worms and shrimp, as well as prepared foods such as krill, pellet food, and freeze-dried tubifex. The Cuvier Bichir may also accept some frozen foods.

Weeksii Bichir

(Polypterus weeksii)
  Click here for a larger image
Weeksii Bichir
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 50 gallons
Care Level: Difficult
Tank Conditions: 77-83F; pH 6.5-7.5; KH 1-12
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 1' 8"
Color Form: Brown, Greenish
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Diet:  Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: West Africa
Family: Polypteridae

The Weeksii Bichir is also known as the Mottled or Fatheaded Bicher, which originates from the Congo basin, Africa. As with other members of the primitive Polypteridae family, the Weeksii Bichir has the unique ability to survive out of water. With a lung-like paired swim bladder and gills to help breathing, the Weeksii Bichir can spend short periods of time on land, but must soon return to its water environment for adequate respiration. This species is snakelike in shape with a very large head and is greenish brown in color with black banding.

The Weeksii Bichir does best in a large "oddball" aquarium with other large, passive fish. When provided with plenty of open swimming areas, rocks and crevices, the Weeksii Bichir is not usually aggressive toward tank mates. This species is semi-aggressive in the fact that they will swallow any fish or invertebrate that they can fit into their mouth, but they are very passive towards other large fish. Prone to jumping, a tight, well-sealed aquarium lid is required.

Eggs are deposited on clumps of vegetation; however, breeding in the hobbyist's aquarium setting is not common.

A carnivorous fish, the Weeksii Bichir requires live food in its diet as well as chopped meats and beef heart.

Palmas Bichir

(Polypterus palmus)
  Click here for a larger image
Palmas Bichir
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 50 gallons
Care Level: Difficult
Tank Conditions: 77-83F; pH 6.5-7.5; KH 1-12
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 1'
Color Form: Brown, Cream
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Diet:  Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: West Africa
Family: Polypteridae

The Palmas Bichir is also known as the Shortfin Bichir and originates from the Congo basin, Africa. As with other members of the primitive Polypteridae family, the Palmas Bichir has the unique ability to survive out of water. With a lung-like paired swim bladder and gills to help breathing, the Palmas Bichir can spend short periods of time on land, but must soon return to its water environment for adequate respiration. This species is snakelike in shape with a tapered, blunt head and is a mottled brown and cream in color.

The Palmas Bichir does best in a large "oddball" aquarium with other large, passive fish. When provided with plenty of open swimming areas, rocks and crevices, the Palmas Bichir is not usually aggressive toward tank mates. This species is semi-aggressive in the fact that they will swallow any fish or invertebrate that they can fit into their mouth, but they are very passive towards other large fish. Be sure to provide an aquarium of more than 100 gallons if incorporating another Bichir with the Palmas. Prone to jumping, a tight, well-sealed aquarium lid is required.

Eggs are deposited on clumps of vegetation; however, breeding in the hobbyist's aquarium setting is not common.

A carnivorous fish, the Palmas Bichir requires live food in its diet as well as chopped meats and beef heart.

Retropinnis Bichir

(Polypterus retropinnis)
  Click here for a larger image
Retropinnis Bichir
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 50 gallons
Care Level: Difficult
Tank Conditions: 77-83F; pH 6.5-7.5; KH 1-12
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 1'
Color Form: Brown, Yellow
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Diet:  Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: West Africa
Family: Polypteridae

The Retropinnis Bichir is also known as the West African or Speckled Bichir and originates from the Congo basin, Africa. As with other members of the primitive Polypteridae family, the Retropinnis Bichir has the unique ability to survive out of water. With a lung-like paired swim bladder and gills to help breathing, the Retropinnis Bichir can spend short periods of time on land, but must soon return to its water environment for adequate respiration. This species is snakelike in shape with a tapered, blunt head and is a yellowish brown in color with many dark patches that extend from the dorsal fin into the body of the fish.

The Retropinnis Bichir does best in a large "oddball" aquarium with other large, passive fish. When provided with plenty of open swimming areas, rocks and crevices, the Retropinnis Bichir is not usually aggressive toward tank mates. This species is semi-aggressive in the fact that they will swallow any fish or invertebrate that they can fit into their mouth, but they are very passive towards other large fish. Be sure to provide an aquarium of more than 100 gallons if incorporating another Bichir with the Retropinnis. Prone to jumping, a tight, well-sealed aquarium lid is required.

Eggs are deposited on clumps of vegetation; however, breeding in the hobbyist's aquarium setting is not common.

A carnivorous fish, the Retropinnis Bichir requires live food in its diet as well as chopped meats and beef heart.

Delhezi Bichir

(Polypterus delhezi)
  Click here for a larger image
Delhezi Bichir
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 50 gallons
Care Level: Difficult
Tank Conditions: 77-83F; pH 6.5-7.5; KH 1-12
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 1' 2"
Color Form: Black, Gray, Silver
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Diet:  Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: West Africa
Family: Polypteridae

The Delhezi Bichir is also known as the Armored or Banded Bichir and originates from the Congo basin, Africa. As with other members of the primitive Polypteridae family, the Delhezi Bichir has the unique ability to survive out of water. With a lung-like paired swim bladder and gills to help breathing, the Delhezi Bichir can spend short periods of time on land, but must soon return to its water environment for adequate respiration. This species is snakelike in shape with a tapered, blunt head and is silver/grey in appearance with many black vertical bars covering the back of the fish. Their mouth is relatively small when compared to other Bichir.

The Delhezi Bichir does best in a large "oddball" aquarium with other large, passive fish. When provided with plenty of open swimming areas, rocks and crevices, the Delhezi Bichir is not usually aggressive toward tank mates. This species is semi-aggressive in the fact that they will swallow any fish or invertebrate that they can fit into their mouth, but they are very passive towards other large fish. Be sure to provide an aquarium of more than 100 gallons if incorporating another Bichir with the Delhezi. Prone to jumping, a tight, well-sealed aquarium lid is required.

Eggs are deposited on clumps of vegetation; however, breeding in the hobbyist's aquarium setting is not common.

A carnivorous fish, the Delhezi Bichir requires live food in its diet as well as chopped meats and beef heart.

Enter subhead content here

Enter content here

Enter supporting content here