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Betta - Male

(Betta splendens)
Betta - Male
Quick Stats
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 75-86F; pH 6.0-8.0; KH 0-25
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 3"
Color Form: Red, Turquoise, Various Colorations
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised, Thailand
Family: Belontiidae

The Betta is a type of "Siamese" Fighting Fish. These fish have been bred over the years to enhance the fins and remarkable variety of colors of the males, as well as making them increasingly combative. Therefore, only one male should be kept in a tank; however, smaller, shorter-finned females may be housed together with caution. In addition, a male and a female should only be housed together temporarily for breeding purposes. Females can be as colorful as the males, although, they rarely have the long finnage that is seen with the males.

An ideal environment for the Betta is an aquarium that holds a steady temperature and does not contain tank mates that may nip at their long fins. Do not house more than one male in the same aquarium, as they will fight.

Once laid by the female, the eggs are tended by the male in a bubblenest. Fry appear in about 24 hours and must be fed very small food initially, such as crushed or powdered flakes and newly hatched brine shrimp. Fry will also take finely chopped hard-boiled egg yolk.

Provide the Betta with a carnivorous diet consisting of a quality flake food, frozen or freeze dried blood worms and brine shrimp.

Betta - Female

(Betta splendens)
Betta - Female
Quick Stats
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 75-86F; pH 6.0-8.0; KH 0-25
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 3"
Color Form: Red, Turquoise, Various Colorations
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised, Thailand
Family: Belontiidae

The female Betta is a type of "Siamese" Fighting Fish. These fish have been bred over the years to enhance the fins and remarkable variety of colors of the males, as well as making them increasingly combative. Therefore, only one male should be kept in a tank; however, smaller, shorter-finned females may be housed together with caution. In addition, a male and a female should only be housed together temporarily for breeding purposes. Females can be as colorful as the males, although, they rarely have the long finnage that is seen with the males.

An ideal environment for the Female Betta is an aquarium that holds a steady temperature and does not contain tank mates that may nip at their fins. Provide an aquarium of at least 10 gallons if housed with a male Betta in order to reduce aggression.

Once laid by the female, the eggs are tended by the male in a bubble nest. Fry appear in about 24 hours and must be fed very small food initially, such as crushed or powdered flakes and newly hatched brine shrimp. Fry will also take finely chopped hard-boiled egg yolk.

A carnivore, the Betta will eat all types of live food as well as freeze-dried flakes and frozen foods.

Crown Tail Betta

(Betta splendens)
  Click here for a larger image
Crown Tail Betta
Quick Stats
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 75-86F; pH 6.0-8.0; KH 0-25
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 3"
Color Form: Red, Turquoise, Various Colorations
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised, Thailand
Family: Belontiidae

The Crown Tail Betta has a striking, elaborate tail that differentiates it from other Bettas. The Crown Tail has a teardrop shape to its tail while the Twin Tail is split, almost giving the suggestion of having two tails. The Crown Tail Betta is a type of "Siamese" Fighting Fish. These fish have been bred over the years to enhance the fins and remarkable variety of colors of the males, as well as making them increasingly combative. Therefore, only one male should be kept in a tank; however, smaller, shorter-finned females may be housed together with caution. In addition, a male and a female should only be housed together temporarily for breeding purposes. Females can be as colorful as the males, although, they rarely have the long finnage that is seen with the males.

An ideal environment for the Betta is an aquarium that holds a steady temperature and does not contain tank mates that may nip at their long fins. Do not house more than one male in the same aquarium, as they will fight.

Once laid by the female, the eggs are tended by the male in a bubble nest. Fry appear in about 24 hours and must be fed very small food initially, such as crushed or powdered flakes and newly hatched brine shrimp. Fry will also take finely chopped hard-boiled egg yolk.

A carnivore, the Crown Tail Betta will eat all types of live food as well as freeze-dried flakes and frozen foods.

Twin Tail Betta

(Betta splendens)
Twin Tail Betta
Quick Stats
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 75-86F; pH 6.0-8.0; KH 0-25
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 3"
Color Form: Red, Turquoise, Various Colorations
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised, Thailand
Family: Belontiidae

This variety of Betta has a striking, elaborate tail that differentiates it from other Bettas. The Twin Tail has a split tail, almost giving the suggestion of having two tails. A similar fish, the Crown Tail, has a teardrop shape to its tail. The Twin Tail Betta is a type of "Siamese" Fighting Fish. These fish have been bred over the years to enhance the fins and remarkable variety of colors of the males, as well as making them increasingly combative. Therefore, only one male should be kept in a tank; however, smaller, shorter-finned females may be housed together with caution. In addition, a male and a female should only be housed together temporarily for breeding purposes. Females can be as colorful as the males, although, they rarely have the long finnage that is seen with the males.

An ideal environment for the Betta is an aquarium that holds a steady temperature and does not contain tank mates that may nip at their long fins. Do not house more than one male in the same aquarium, as they will fight.

Once laid by the female, the eggs are tended by the male in a bubble nest. Fry appear in about 24 hours and must be fed very small food initially, such as crushed or powdered flakes and newly hatched brine shrimp. Fry will also take finely chopped hard-boiled egg yolk.

A carnivore, the Twin Tail Betta will eat all types of live food as well as freeze-dried flakes and frozen foods.

Betta Information
 
 
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Perciformes (perch-like fish)
Family: Belontiidae
Scientific Name: Betta splendens
Common Name: Betta
Other Common Names: Siamese fighting fish
Distribution: Asia: Mekong, Chao Phraya and Xe Bangfai basins; also from the Malay Peninsula, Sumatra and Borneo.
Diet: Will eat almost all live foods and many prepared foods. But, it prefers flake food, freeze-dried bloodworms, tubiflex worms, and brine shrimp. A varied diet with some high-fiber foods thrown in is needed to prevent intestinal blockage.
Temperament: The males are highly aggressive toward their own kind (and toward similar-looking fish). They often will attack gouramis and fancy guppies (anything with big, colorful fins). Males should be kept alone or with a group of females (a "harem"). If kept with one female, the male will constantly pick on her. The female is also territorial, in that they fight amongst themselves for dominance. When new females are added, the old ones pick at her until they assert who's the boss. Each one pairs off with her one at a time and attempts to bite/jab at the newcomer. When the aggressor gets tired (assuming the older female "wins"), they often rotate to the next in line. This has happened almost everytime I add new females to an established tank. The new female(s) ends up tattered almost everytime, but she is not killed. One time, I added 6 females to a new tank at once, so it was no one's "home turf". They paired off and fought almost all night long. Everybody looked bad in the morning - tattered fins all around.
Sexing:
Breeding: Breeding a pair of Bettas is not complicated but a lot of patience and observation is required. A breeding tank with some kind of divider (often a glass globe from a storm lantern) is needed to keep the male from harming the female until they get acquainted. Once the female is released, vegetation/hiding places are a must. The male should have a bubble nest built to hold the eggs, but if one is not bulit before the spawning takes place, he can bulid one as he picks up the eggs. The two should be observed closely in case the male decides to harass or kill the female instead of mating with her and vice versa. Nipped fins almost always results anyway, but one or the other may seriously hurt its mate if one or the other is not yet ready for breeding. After the mating is over, the female should be removed from the tank. The male will take care of the eggs and the fry when they hatch. Newborn fry will hang down from the bubblenest and will live on the egg sack. After they are free-swimming, they can be fed baby brine shrimp or infusoria if they are too small for BBS.
Special Care:
Other Comments: An excellent beginner fish that can withstand very poor water conditions, small containers, and stressors well, due to its labyrinth organ (a kind of primitive lung that enables it to breathe from the surface). Although it can survive in these conditions, high water quality is important for them to thrive.

 

Species Stats
Min. Tank Size: 1 gallons
Temperature: 70-84 F
pH: 5.0-9.0
Max Size: 3 inches

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