Make your own free website on Tripod.com

Puffers

Home
African Cichlids
American Cichlids
Anabantids
Angel Fish
Arowana
Barbs
Bettas
Bicha
Catfish/Corydora
Characins (Tetras)
Danios
Discus
Dwarf Cichlids
Goldfish
Guppies
Hatchets
Invertabrates
Killifish
Loaches
Mollies
Piranhas
Platies
Plecos
Puffers
Rainbows
Rasboras
Sharks
Suckermouth Cats
Swordtails
Miscellaneous & Uncatergorized
Experienced
Fishies
Local Stores
Set Up Ideas

Enter subhead content here

Green Spotted
Pea Puffer (Dwarf)
Figure 8
 

Dwarf (Malabar) Pufferfish 

These tiny puffers are imported from India.  They are surprisingly hardy fish and they are also know as pea puffers. They are said to be semi aggressive, but I find they are a good community fish, as long as you have a big enough tank.  Males have a brown vertical line on their belly , which can darken and fade. The females don't have this.  Dwarf puffers seem to eat bloodworms.  If they don't at first, then try little tiny pond snails and ghost shrimp.  They stay tiny at about 3 cm and don't eat your plants.  They don't require any salt, but I do add  a little.  These little guys do have a personality.  They eat right out of my fingers, if I hold the food semi in the water.  They see me when I'm near the tank and all swim up to see what I'm doing.  They are very cute fish.

 Scientific Name:

  Carinotetraodon travancoricus

 Family:

  Puffer

 Temperature:

  22 - 28 C; 72 - 82 F

 PH

  7.0 - 8.3

 Size: 

  2.5 cm; 1 inch

 Life Span: 

  years

 Breeding: 

  Difficult

Compatibility:

Other puffers and compatible in a large community tank.

Figure 8 Pufferfish

These puffers orignate in freshwaters of Southeast Asia and are said to be a little nippy.  I have them in a tank with my other pufferfish and haven't had any kind of a problem.  I have also heard personal stories from pufferfish owners that they nip, so take extra precaution when introducing them to a new tank.  Figure 8s are said to be brackish water fish , but there is still quite a debate on whether this is true or not.  Most hobbyists would say to add some salt, but not much.  Salt is good for most freshwater fish, as it kills bacteria if they have a wound.  It's not bad in proper quantities.

 

 Scientific Name:

  Tetraodon biocellatus

 Family:

  Puffer

 Temperature:

  22 - 26 C; 72 - 79 F

 PH

  6.5 - 7.5

 Size: 

  6 cm; 2.5 inches

 Life Span: 

  5 years

 Breeding: 

  Difficult

Compatibility:

Other puffers.  Possibly aggressive and may nip other fish.

Spotted Green Pufferfish

These guys are my personal favorite.  I have had one now for two years and he's getting big.  I must say from what I have seen, they are one of the smartest fish and are friendly to humans.  They do get nippy and aggressive at times.  They can be placed in a community tank with other fish, but keep a close watch and feed them well.  These puffers are always hungry.  I find if they are feed them three times a day in smaller amounts that they nip less.  Their nipping also depends on the size of the tank and the amount of swimming space that they have.

Spotted Green Pufferfish are very entertaining to watch, especially their swimming patterns.  They will live a long time if taken care of properly.  From my experience, this type of puffer is very sensitive, so if you are a beginner, I suggest you start with the hardier dwarf puffer.  Spotted Green Pufferfish eat frozen then thawed bloodworms, ghost shrimp and pond snails . The snails keep their beak from growing too large.  These puffers are a definite brackish water fish.  When they get older, they can be introduced slowly into a fully saltwater environment.  In saltwater, they will do better and their colors are vibrant.

 

 Scientific Name:

  Tetraodon nigroviridis

 Family:

  Puffer

 Temperature:

  24 - 28 C; 75 - 82 F

 PH

  8

 Size: 

  10 - 17 cm; 4 - 7 inches

 Life Span: 

  years

 Breeding: 

  Difficult

Compatibility:

Other puffers.  Nippy in a community tank unless they have adequate space and food.

 

Fahaka
(Tetraodon lineatus)
Fahaka Puffer
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 125 gallons
Care Level: Difficult
Tank Conditions: 75-79F; pH 6.8-7.4; KH 5-10
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 1' 8"
Color Form: Brown, Cream, Gray
Temperament: Aggressive
Diet:  Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: African River Systems, Freshwater Lakes of Africa
Family: Tetraodontidae

The Fahaka Puffer, also known as the Nile Puffer or Band Puffer, comes from the lakes and rivers of Africa and can grow to a very large size. They will inhabit both freshwater and brackish waters of the river systems, but tend to do best in freshwater in the home aquarium. The Fahaka is brownish gray on the back fading to an off-white on the underbelly, with a series of lighter horizontal stripes running from the tail to the pectoral fin.

The Fahaka requires a very large aquarium, and because of their temperament, are best kept by themselves. They can become very aggressive in captivity, and caution must be exercised when choosing tank mates. Many plants and rocks should be included in the set-up providing the Puffer with plenty of hiding places.

The Fahaka has not been successfully bred in captivity and little is known about their breeding habits. It is known that, in the wild, they spawn in very deep water.

Their diet should consist mainly of crustaceans such as brine shrimp, krill, mollusks, and earthworms.

Indian Dwarf Puffer

(Tetraodon travancoricus)
Indian Dwarf Puffer
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Moderate
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 7.0-8.0; KH 5-15
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 1"
Color Form: Brown, Cream, Gold
Temperament: Aggressive
Diet:  Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Freshwaters of India
Family: Tetraodontidae

The Indian Dwarf Puffer is also known as the Bumblebee, Malabar, or Pygmy Puffer. This puffer is much smaller than other puffers in the same family, as it only reaches a maximum length of 1 inch. It is golden-brown on the back which fades to an off white on the belly. Dark brown to black spots covers most of this fish. The male of this species is leaner, with less of a round shape when compared to the female. Also, the male has a pronounced black stripe running from the tail to the pectoral fin.

The ideal set up for the Indian Dwarf Puffer is a planted aquarium of at least 30 gallons with plenty of hiding places. Unlike the other puffers in this family, the Indian Dwarf requires freshwater with no salt content. The males are very territorial and only one per aquarium is suggested unless it is a large system.

The Indian Dwarf Puffer should be fed crustacean foods such as brine shrimp, krill, mollusks and earthworms.

Enter content here

Enter supporting content here