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Discus

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             Dicus Varities

Andrea Red
Andrea Red
Blue Diamond
Cherry Blossom
Cloud Leopold
Leopard Snakeskin
Marlboro
Marlboro
Star Burst
White
Passion Melon
Rabbit Eyes
Rabbit Eyes
Red Melon
Red Melon
Red Melon
Red Spotted Golden
Red Spotted Golden
Star Burst
White

DISCUS
 

The Discus or Discus Fish originates from slow moving, soft, acidic waters of wood and leaves in the Amazon basin.  They are sometimes called the King of Aquarium fish.  They require very clean water, so they aren't recommended as a beginner fish.  There are two main species: 

  • Symphysodon aequifasciatus, which includes Aequifasciatus (Green Discus), Axelrodi (Brown Discus) and Haraldi (Blue Discus)
  • Symphysodon Discus, which includes Discus (True Discus or Heckel Discus) and Willischwartzi.  These are more difficult fish to maintain.

The Discus has dorsal and anal fins that run together into the caudal fin accentuating their thin circular profile.  The originating wild versions have dark horizontal banding.  There are usually two predominant colors in intricate woven patterns.  Discus have been bred in captivity to produce a wide variation in brilliant colors with names such as cobalt blue, turquoise, red dragon, pigeon blood, royal, marlboro red, snakeskin, ocean green, red-turquoise and blue diamond.  Some show varieties command exorbitant prices.  

Discus grow very large, so a minimum tank size is 40 gallons, which would keep about 4 Discus.  Discus are cichlids and are aggressive, so the best combinations are a single discus, a mated pair, or a large group to spread aggression among.   Although Discus do better in schools, but this is not practical for most aquariums.  The tank should be heavily planted.  Water can be softened by filtering through peat.  Water lilies and floating plant cover provide subdued lighting, which is preferred.  Carbon filtration can help maintain water quality and weekly water changes are a continuous requirement.  Discus will eat Tetra Min flakes, Tetra ColorBits, Tetra Prima, spirulina flakes, spinach, freeze dried bloodworms, brine shrimp, discus pellets, small fish and beef heart.  Feeding Discus can be expensive and also requires clean up to maintain water quality.  Discus are subject to intestinal parasites.  Higher temperatures are suggested for sick fish.

It is difficult to tell the difference between sexes.  The best method of determining sex is to obtain a group of young fish and watch as pairs form.  Spawning occurs on smooth flat surfaces such as leaves, pots, rocks or aquarium glass.  The pair will clean the surface meticulously .  The female can lay hundreds of eggs, which are fertilized by the male after the eggs are all laid.  The parents guard the eggs.  Fry will hatch in about 2 days.  The parents should remain with the fry.  The fry feed on skin secretions from the parents for the first 10 days, after which the parents can be removed and the fry can be fed brine shrimp.

 Scientific Name:   Symphysodon aequifasciatus
 Family:   Cichlid
 Temperature:   26 - 30 C;  79 - 86F
 PH   4.2 - 6.2
 Size:    12 cm; 5 inches
 Life Span:    10 years
 Breeding: 
  Normal, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Appistogramma dwarf cichlids, cardinal tetras, clown loaches, corydoras, glowlight tetras, neon tetras, ottos, ram cichlids