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Characins (Tetras)

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Black Neon 
 
 
The Black Neon Tetra originally came from Brazil.  It is distinguished by red in its eye and a thin iridescent pale green line from the eye to the tail.  It is dark below this line fading to a silvery belly.  The fins are nearly colorless.  It is not a black variation of the Neon Tetra, but is a completely different species.  It is a schooling fish, like other tetras, and does better with at least 6 of its kind.   It combines nicely with other large tetras. 

Live food will help induce breeding.  The females are slightly broader and larger than the males.  A pair should be separated into a breeding tank containing soft acidic water.  Light should be allowed slowly into the tank in the early morning.  Eggs will be scattered on plants and substrate.  Remove the adults after breeding.  Hundreds of fry can hatch in a day and will be swimming before the week is out.  Feed the fry infusoria or extremely small flakes after they have consumed their yolk sac.

(Hyphessobrycon herbertaxelrodi)
Black Neon Tetra
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallon
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-77F; pH 5.5-7.0; KH 4-8
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 1"
Color Form: Black, Yellow/Green
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised
Family: Characidae

The Black Neon Tetra is a very popular freshwater tetra, which originally came from the clear water streams of South America. This fish has markings that are similar to the Neon Tetra, except the bottom half of the fish is black with a bright yellowish green stripe running horizontally across the fish. They are a great addition to any soft water community aquarium.

Black Neon Tetras add beauty to a planted aquarium; the plants, in turn, will provide hiding places for the fish. Rocks and driftwood also help to mirror its natural habitat. It thrives in slightly acidic water and will do best when water parameters are kept constant. The Neon Tetras are a schooling fish and will do best if kept in odd numbers of 5 or more.

To breed Black Neon Tetras, separate a pair into a "breeder tank" with no lighting at first, and then gradually increase it until spawning occurs. Water hardness should be less than 4 degrees and live food such as mosquito larvae are great inducers. Be sure to remove the adults after the eggs have been laid, as they will eat them. The eggs should hatch within 30 hours.

Black Neon Tetras will accept many small foods such as brine shrimp or daphnia, freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex, micro pellet food, and a high quality flake food.

 Scientific Name:
  Hyphessobrycon
  herbertaxelrodi
 Family:   Characin
 Temperature:   23 - 26 C; 74 - 79 F
 PH   6.7
 Size:    4 cm; 1.5 inches
 Life Span:    5 - 10 years
 Breeding:    Normal, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Black Skirt Tetra, Blind Cave Tetra, Bloodfin Tetra, Buenos Aries Tetra, Corydoras Catfish, Diamond Tetra, Glass Catfish, Glassfish, GloFish, Kuhli Loach, Lemon Tetra, Mollies, Platies, Plecostomus, Red Eye Tetra, Serpae Tetra, Silver Hatchet, Silver Tip Tetra, Swordtails, White Cloud, Zebra Danio
Black Phantom Tetra
 

This is one of the most intriguing tropical fish because of its ability to change color.  The Black Phantom Tetra originally came from Brazil and Bolivia.  It has a transparent silver gray body with a black spot behind its gills.  The pelvic, anal, and adipose fins are tipped in reddish color, especially for the female.  The Black Phantom is very similar to the Red Phantom.  It is a very timid fish and likes hiding places in the mid levels of an aquarium.  

Males will turn almost completely black on a regular basis.  This can occur throughout the day, but is more common in the evening.  It is usually associated with defending a territory against another male.  The males intertwine and tilt their bodies toward each other in a display reminiscent of spawning.  Phantoms should be kept in schools of 6 to 10.  A single Phantom kept in a tank will lose its distinctive coloring. They will eat food flakes, spirulina, freeze-dried bloodworms and live foods, such as brine shrimp and bloodworms. A healthy diet is essential in bringing out full coloring.

Black Phantom Tetras spawn among plants and hundreds of eggs will attach to the plants.  Soft water is essential and the parents should be removed after spawning.  The fry should be fed brine shrimp.

(Megalamphodus megalopterus)
Black Phantom Tetra
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 20 gallons
Care Level: Moderate
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 6.0-7.5; KH 4-8
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 2"
Color Form: Black, Gray
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Central Brazil
Family: Characidae

The Black Phantom Tetra is a very peaceful, schooling fish that comes from the regions of Central Brazil. Receiving its name from its black translucent coloring, the hardy Black Phantom Tetra is great for any community aquarium. Males of the species will have a higher dorsal fin, and display a more brilliant coloration.

Hiding spaces such as rocks, plants, and driftwood are recommended to give this fish a sense of security. Taller plants should be used to coincide with its mid-level swimming habits along with plenty of rock formed cave structures.

Phantom Tetras will breed occasionally in an aquarium setting and a hospital or "breeding tank" will be necessary. Slightly acidic water is best for optimal breeding habits. After the eggs have been fertilized, removing the parents will be necessary to reduce the number of lost fry. Feed the fry baby brine shrimp or crushed flake food.

The Black Phantom Tetra will accept many small foods such as brine shrimp or daphnia, freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex, micro pellet food, and a high quality flake food.

 Scientific Name:   Hyphessobrycon megalopterus
 Family:   Characin
 Temperature:   23 - 26 C; 74 - 79 F
 PH   6.5
 Size:    5 cm; 2 inches
 Life Span:    5 years
 Breeding:    Normal, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Cardinal Tetra, Corydoras Catfish, Ghost Shrimp, Glowlight Tetra, Glass Fish, Guppies, Harlequin Rasbora, Honey Gouramis, Ram Cichlid, Neon Tetra, White Cloud
Black Skirt Tetra & White Skit Tetra
 
The Black Skirt Tetra originates from South America. They are extremely hardy and therefore good for beginning aquarists.  They are also known as the Black Widow and the Black Tetra.  They are not the same as the Black Neon.  Their distinctive feature is an anal fin that forms a broad skirt.  The tail fin is translucent, while the dorsal and anal fins are black.  There are black vertical stripes across the body.  The black "skirt" can vary from black to translucent depending on mood and breeding activity.    The black stripes tend to lengthen with age.  In addition to the Black Skirt, varieties include the White Skirt, Gold Skirt, and Long-Finned.

A planted tank with floating plant cover, hiding places and open swimming space is preferred.  Tall plants should also be provided for this mid level swimmer.  They are a typical schooling tetra and should be kept in groups of at least 6.  They are also very active and may not provide a good mix with some of the slower moving tetras only because they tend to disturb the peaceful pattern in the tank.  They eat flake foods, freeze dried bloodworms and brine shrimp.

Females are broader but are difficult to distinguish from males.  Larger males will usually establish a territory as an indication of readiness to spawn.  Soft, slightly acidic water is best for breeding and lighting should be greatly dimmed.  Tetras have adhesive eggs, so fine leaved plants should be used to catch the eggs.  The parents should be removed after spawning.  The fry will hatch within a couple of days and will survive several days on their yolk sac.  The fry should be fed brine shrimp and then finely ground flake foods.

The White Skirt variety is frequently dipped in dyes of various colors.  This results in the following Mixed-Fruit varieties: Strawberry Tetra, Blueberry Tetra, Grape Tetra, and the Painted White Skirt.  At Tim's Tropicals we don't sell dyed fish.  For more information about campaigns against dyeing, refer to the Glass Fish.

 

 Scientific Name:   Gymnocorymbus ternetzi
 Family:   Characin
 Temperature:   20 - 28 C; 68 - 82 F
 PH   6.0 - 8.0
 Size:    5 cm; 2 inches
 Life Span:    5 years
 Breeding:    Difficult, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Corydoras Catfish, Large Active Tetras such as the Buenos Aires, Serpae and Silver Tip Tetra; also Mollies, Platies, Plecostomus, Swordtails,  Zebra Danio
(Gymnocorymbus sp.)
Black Skirt Tetra
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 20 gallons
Care Level: Moderate
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 6.0-7.5; KH 4-8
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 2"
Color Form: Black, Silver
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: South America
Family: Characidae

The Black Skirt Tetra is a very peaceful, schooling fish that comes from the regions of South America. Receiving its name from its black translucent coloring, the hardy Black Skirt Tetra is great for any community aquarium. These Tetras are silver in color with black stripes and long flowing black fins.

Hiding spaces such as rocks, plants, and driftwood are recommended to give this fish a sense of security. Taller plants should be used to coincide with its mid-level swimming habits along with plenty of rock formed cave structures.

Black Skirt Tetras will breed occasionally in an aquarium setting and a hospital or "breeding tank" will be necessary. Slightly acidic water is best for optimal breeding habits. After the eggs have been fertilized, removing the parents will be necessary to reduce the number of lost fry. Feed the fry baby brine shrimp or crushed flake food.

The Black Skirt Tetra will accept many small foods such as brine shrimp or daphnia, freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex, micro pellet food, and a high quality flake food.

Bleeding Heart Tetra
 
The Bleeding Heart Tetra comes from Upper Amazon of South America. It was formerly known by the scientific name Hyphessobrycon rubrostigma. The Bleeding Heart has a silver/pink tone to the body and has more height than many tetras. Its distinguishing feature is a red spot on the mid line just forward of the beginning of the dorsal fin – the “heart”. 

The Bleeding Heart is active and will appreciate open swimming areas. It will also appreciate the company of other Bleeding Hearts. The tank should be dimly lit, which can be accomplished through plants and dark substrate. The water should be soft and acidic, with good filtration. They will eat flake foods, tubifex, freeze dried bloodworms and brine shrimp. A varied diet can enhance coloring.

Males have a slightly more concave dorsal fin and females will be larger and broader when ready to spawn. Similar to Black Phantoms, the males will turn darker and dance around each other at unusual angles to establish territories. Breeding in captivity is not documented.

(Hyphessobrycon erythrostigma)
Bleeding Heart Tetra
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 20 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-77F; pH 6.0-6.5; KH 4-8
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 2"
Color Form: Red
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised, Thailand
Family: Characidae

The Bleeding Heart Tetra gets its name from the markings on its body. The blushing red near the gills gives this South American fish a "bleeding heart" look. Perfect for the community aquarium, this hardy tetra will be a great choice for the beginner to the expert aquarist.

A planted tank of at least 20 gallons will be the ideal environment for this tetra. Rocks and driftwood help mirror its natural habitat and will help to reduce stress on the fish. The Bleeding Heart Tetra does best will soft slightly acidic water with high filtration.

The Bleeding Heart Tetra will breed occasionally in an aquarium setting and a hospital or "breeding tank" will be necessary. Slightly acidic water is best for optimal breeding habits. After the eggs are laid removing the parents will be necessary to reduce the number of lost fry.

The Bleeding Heart Tetra will accept many small foods such as brine shrimp or daphnia, freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex, micro pellet food, and a high quality flake food.

 Scientific Name:   Hyphessobrycon erythrostigma
 Family:   Characin
 Temperature:   22 - 28 C; 72 - 82 F
 PH   6.0 - 8.0
 Size:    7 cm; 2.5 inches
 Life Span:    5 years
 Breeding:    Difficult, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Corydoras Catfish,  Danios, Mollies, Platies, Plecostomus, Silver Hatchet, Swordtails,  Tetras
Blind Cave Tetra

The Blind Cave Tetra is also known as the Mexican Tetra, Blind Cave Fish or the Silvery Tetra. They are a good beginner’s fish, as they can tolerate great variation in water temperature and quality.  The scientific name was originally Anoptichthys jordani, but it is now classified as Astyanax fasciatus mexicanus. The Blind Cave Tetra is a northern sub species and is found in cave waters in Texas and Mexico. The eyed version extends from Central to South America.

The body is a flesh/silvery color without features and the fins are colorless. The dorsal fin has a broad arch to it. The main feature of the Blind Cave Tetra is an absence of eyes. They are born with eyes, but the sight deteriorates quickly and the eyes become distorted and covered over within a few weeks. They navigate in darkness quite well and have well developed taste buds. This schooling fish has an ability to avoid bumping into other fish, which is not clearly understood.

Blind Cave Tetras should be provided with dim lighting and small to medium size gravel. Or, better yet, give them some caves. Plants are not essential. The tank should be covered as Blind Cave Tetras will jump when they are stressed.  They eat flake foods, freeze dried bloodworms and live brine shrimp.

Blind Cave Tetras are one of the more aggressive tetras and they will nip fins.  They should be kept with aggressive larger tetras, such as the Buenos Aires Tetra, the Colombian Tetra, the Serpae Tetra and the Silver Tip Tetra.  They are definitely not good companions for smaller tetras and guppies.  

The females are larger and broader, especially when laden with eggs.  There is no distinguishing color difference between males and females.  If differentiating the sexes is difficult, the best way to breed Blind Cave Tetras is to start with a group of about 6 and let them choose pairings. They are typical tetra egg layers. Parents should be separated and fed live foods prior to spawning. A drop in water temperature may induce breeding. Up to one hundred eggs can be scattered throughout the breeding tank. The parents should be removed after spawning. The eggs will hatch in a couple of days and the fry will be ready for brine shrimp and finely ground flake foods within a week.

 Scientific Name:   Astyanax fasciatus mexicanus
 Family:   Characin
 Temperature:   20 - 30 C; 68 - 86 F
 PH   6.0 - 7.8
 Size:    9 cm; 3.5 inches
 Life Span:    5 years
 Breeding:    Normal, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Buenos Aires Tetra, Corydoras Catfish, Danios, Large Tetras,  Mollies, Platies, Plecostomus, Serpae Tetra, Silver Dollar, Silver Tip Tetra, Swordtails
Bloodfin Tetra

The Bloodfin Tetra originates from the Parana River basin of Argentina in South America.  They are also known as the Glass Bloodfin, the Red-finned Characin, the Red-finned Tetra and the Argentine Bloodfin.  They are quite easy to keep.  The body is translucent while the fins, especially the tail and lower fins, are red.  Their color will fade under lower temperatures, but they do not require a heated aquarium.

A planted tank with floating plant cover, hiding places and open swimming space is preferred.  They are a typical schooling tetra and should be kept in groups of at least 6.  They eat flake foods, freeze dried bloodworms and brine shrimp.

Females are broader and paler than males.  The males have a small hook on their anal fin.  Tetras have adhesive eggs, so fine leaved plants should be used to catch the eggs.  The parents should be removed after spawning.  The fry will hatch within a couple of days and will survive several days on their yolk sac.  The fry should be fed brine shrimp and then finely ground flake foods.

 Scientific Name:   Aphyocharax anisitsi
 Family:   Characin
 Temperature:   18 - 28 C; 64 - 82 F
 PH   6.0 - 8.0
 Size:    5 cm; 2 inches
 Life Span:    5 - 10 years
 Breeding:    Normal, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Corydoras Catfish, Large Tetras,  Mollies, Platies, Plecostomus, Silver Hatchet, Swordtails,  Zebra Danio
 
 
Buenos Aires Tetra (Normal & Albino)Albino Buenos Aires Tetra
 
The Buenos Aires tetra originates from the Paran and Uruguay River basins. This is in the region of Buenos Aires, Argentina.  They are known by the scientific name Hemigrammus caudovittatus and by Hyphessobrycon anisitsi.  They are one of the hardiest tetras and are easy to keep but are not a favorite of plant lovers, because of their propensity to eat them.  Buenos Aires Tetras have a clear body with a thin blue line through from the gills to the caudal fin.  The caudal and lower fins have an orange tint.  There is a dark area at the base of the caudal fin.  Coloring is brighter during spawning.  There is also an Albino Buenos Aires variety.

Buenos Aires Tetras are one of the more aggressive tetras and they will nip fins. They should be kept with aggressive larger tetras, such as the Blind Cave Tetra, , the Colombian Tetra, the Serpae Tetra and the Silver Tip Tetra.  They are definitely not good companions for smaller tetras and guppies.  They should be kept in groups of at least 6 to reduce aggression.  They need lots of open swimming space, as they are very active.  Rocks and driftwood will be appreciated.  Plants should be plastic unless you intend them to be eaten, though Java Fern may survive.  Buenos Aires should not be kept with slow feeding fish, as they will prevent the slower fish from obtaining food.  They will eat high quality flake food, freeze dried bloodworms, tubifex and pellets.  They love live brine shrimp.

Typical of most tetras, the females have larger and broader bodies.  For breeding, an area of bushy plants should be provided in a separate tank where the water level has been greatly reduced.  Slightly acidic water is best.  Eggs will be scattered through the plants.  The parents should be removed after spawning.  The eggs will hatch in a couple of days and the fry will be ready for brine shrimp and finely ground flake foods within a week.

(Hemigrammus caudovittatus)
Albino Buenos Aires Tetra
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallon
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 64-82F; pH 5.8-8.5; KH 4-8
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 2"
Color Form: Pale, Silver
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: South America
Family: Characidae

The Albino Buenos Aires Tetra is a South American fish that will make a great addition to any community aquarium. It has a slender silver body with red fins.

The Buenos Aires Tetra can be housed in a aquarium with other soft water fish. Tetras are a schooling fish that work well in groups of six or more fish of the same species. Artificial plants, rocks and driftwood help to enhance its natural habitat and provide hiding spaces. The Buenos Aires Tetra will eat most live plants, except Java Fern.

Albino Buenos Aires Tetras breed occasionally in an aquarium setting and a hospital or "breeding tank" will be necessary. Slightly acidic water is best for optimal breeding habits. After the eggs begin to hatch, removing the parents will reduce the number of lost fry.

The Albino Buenos Aires Tetra will accept many small foods such as brine shrimp or daphnia, freeze dried bloodworms and tubifex, micro pellet food, and a high quality flake food.

 Scientific Name:   Hemigrammus caudovittatus
 Family:   Characin
 Temperature:   22 - 28 C; 77 - 82 F
 PH   6.0 - 8.0
 Size:    5 cm; 2 inches
 Life Span:    5 years
 Breeding:    Normal, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Blind Cave Tetra, Corydoras Catfish, Mollies, Platies, Plecostomus, Serpae Tetra, Silver Tip Tetra, Swordtails,  Zebra Danio

Suggested as a good dither fish for Oscars, Pacus, or Jack Dempseys to chase.

Cardinal Tetra
 

The cardinal tetra is very popular for its bright colors.  It is more colorful than the Neon Tetra and can be distinguished by the full red lower body.  It originally came from Columbia and Venezuela.  The tank should be well established as Cardinals are very susceptible to water quality changes and ammonia build up.  After they adjust to a new tank, they are quite hardy and do not suffer from disease the way Neons do.  They appreciate blackwater conditions, which refers to the soft dark water created by the accumulation of decaying leaves in slow moving and still waters.  This can be replicated by filtering through peat or by adding blackwater extract sold by suppliers such as Tetra.  This will turn the water an amber color.  Cardinals are a schooling fish, so 6 to 10 are recommended, which means a tank of 20 gallons or more is best.  They will lose their color if they lack companionship.  A dark substrate and dark background help bring out their color.  Cardinals appreciate low light levels and lots of plants.  They are an extremely peaceful fish and don't compete with other species.  They eat small flake foods, freeze dried bloodworms and live foods, such as brine shrimp.

Females are larger and wider than males. Cardinals spawn on flat surfaces, such as plant leaves.  They prefer low light levels  for breeding, such as dusk and dawn.  The water should be at around 75F with a pH of 5 and a dH of 2, which is very soft.   Blackwater extract will greatly increase the chances of success in breeding.  Up to 100 fry will  hatch in just over 24 hours.  Be sure to remove the parents from the tank before the fry hatch.  The fry will be able to eat finely ground flake foods in about 4 days.  They will quickly become interested in brine shrimp too.

Cardinals are intolerant of malachite green, which is one of the main ingredients in Quick Cure.  Quick Cure should only be used with cardinals if ich is actually present and the dosage should be reduced well below recommended levels.  Otherwise the cure will be worse than the disease. 

 
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallon
Care Level: Moderate
Tank Conditions: 73-81F; pH 5.5-7.5; KH 2-6
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 2"
Color Form: Neon Blue, Red
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised, South America
Family: Characidae

 The Cardinal Tetra originates from the slow moving waters of the various tributaries in South America. In recent years it has become possible to tank raise this species, they are offered in limited amounts. They are a small, peaceful, schooling fish with bright colors. The top half of the fish is a bright blue and the bottom half is bright red. The Cardinal Tetra differs from Neon Tetras in that the lower red stripe runs the length of their body as opposed to the Neon, which has a red stripe running half way along the lower portion of the body.

The ideal set-up is an aquarium of at least 10 gallons, and should be densely planted with plenty of low light areas. The Cardinal Tetra does best in soft water with an acidic pH. Stock these fish in groups of six or more and provide tank mates that are peaceful and do not pose a threat to the Cardinal Tetra.

Breeding the Cardinal Tetra requires very soft water in the 1-2 dH range with a pH of 5-6 and low lighting levels. The female may lay as many as 130 eggs, and the adults should be removed at this time. The eggs will hatch in about 24 hours, and will become waterborne in approximately five days. Feed the fry baby brine shrimp and other suitable small foods.

The Cardinal Tetra will accept many small foods such as brine shrimp or daphnia, freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex, micro pellet food, and high quality flake food.

 Scientific Name:   Paracheirodon axelrodi
 Family:   Characin
 Temperature:   22 - 27 C; 72 - 80 F
 PH   4.0 - 6.8
> Size:    5 cm; 2 inches
 Life Span:    5 years
 Breeding:    Difficult, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Black Phantom Tetra, Corydoras Catfish, Discus, Ghost Shrimp, Glass Fish, Glow Light Tetra, Guppies, Honey Gouramis, Harlequin Rasbora, Otto, Ram Cichlid, Neon Tetra, White Cloud
Columbian Tetra
The Colombian Tetra comes from Colombia. It is also know as the "Columbian" Tetra, the Blue-Red Columbian and the Red Tail Mirror Blue Tetra. It was known by the scientific name Hyphessobrycon ecuadoriensis and more recently as Hyphessobrycon columbianus, which more accurately describes its Colombian origin. It has only been available in pet stores since 1995 and has become a very popular tetra. The Colombian tetra has a band of blue across the upper body with red in the fins, especially in the caudal fin. The lower body is silvery.

The Colombian is very hardy and is a good beginner fish, however it is fairly aggressive and should only be kept with more nippy, active and aggressive tetras, such as the Serpae, Blind Cave, Buenos Aires and the Silver Tip Tetra.  They are definitely not good companions for smaller tetras and guppies. Colombians will be happier and show better colors when kept in groups of 6. They appreciate a well planted tank, but the will eat plants. Colombians will eat flake foods, freeze dried bloodworms and brine shrimp. 

Males and females are difficult to distinguish by coloring. The female is larger and broader, especially when laden with eggs. Soft, slightly acidic water is best for breeding and lighting should be greatly dimmed. Pairs should be separated for more than a week before breeding and fed a variety of foods. Tetras have adhesive eggs, so fine leaved plants or spawning mops should be used to catch the eggs. Colombians will spawn multiple times over a period of days. The parents should be removed after spawning. The fry are very small. Fry should be fed infusoria and the finely ground flake foods.

 Scientific Name:   Hyphessobrycon columbianus
 Family:   Characin
 Temperature:   21 - 28 C; 70 - 82 F
 PH   6.0 - 8.0
 Size:    7 cm; 2.5 inches
 Life Span:    5 years
 Breeding:    Normal, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Corydoras Catfish, Aggressive Tetras,  Mollies, Platies, Plecostomus, Silver Hatchet, Swordtails,  Zebra Danio
Congo Tetra
Male
Female
 
The Congo Tetra originally came from the Congo Basin in Zaire, Africa.  It has large scales that have an iridescent blue/green quality.   Males have longer fins and more color.  The Congo Tetra is very peaceful.  A school of 6 is recommended.  It likes the  middle layers of the aquarium and prefers a large tank, open areas for swimming, plants for hiding and dim lighting.   It likes mosquito larvae.

The Congo Tetra is difficult to breed.  Lower the acidity, increase the amount of light and use a very large tank with a layer of Java Moss covering the bottom.  The parents should be removed from the tank before the hundreds of fry begin to hatch.

(Phenacogrammus interruptus)
Congo Tetra
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Moderate
Tank Conditions: 75-81F; pH 6.0-6.2; KH 4-8
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 3"
Color Form: Gold, Orange, Silver
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Zaire
Family: Alestidae

The Congo Tetra is considered by many to be the jewel of tetras in the home aquarium because of its natural beauty. They have flowing fins that some have described as shimmering and the main color tends to be silver with an orange glow.

Congo Tetras do well in a peaceful community aquarium that is well lit and moderately planted. They prefer to swim in schools of 5-8 in an aquarium that has plenty of room. It is best if this fish is the dominant species in the tank or it may become shy and reclusive.

Congo Tetras are egg layers and because of this you must make sure if breeding to separate the adults from the eggs or the eggs may be eaten. Another consideration is that the eggs of this fish are extremely vulnerable to fungus and the aquarium should be treated accordingly.

The Congo Tetra will accept many small foods such as brine shrimp or daphnia, freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex, micro pellet food, and a high quality flake food.

 Scientific Name:   Phenacogrammus interruptus
 Family:   Characin
 Temperature:   23 - 28 C; 74 - 82 F
 PH   6.6
 Size:    7 cm; 3 inches
 Life Span:    5
 Breeding:    Difficult, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Chinese Algae Eater, Corydoras Catfish, Large Tetras,  Mollies, Platies, Plecostomus, Swordtails,  Zebra Danio
Diamond Tetra
The Diamond Tetra originally came from Venezuela and fed on worms and insects.  The Diamond Tetra gets is name from the golden reflections off its scales at various angles.  It likes a dimly lit tank with plants and open spaces.  It is recommended to keep them in schools of 6 - 10 fish.  To bring out the color, feed the Diamond Tetra high quality flakes, along with brine shrimp, bloodworms or frozen foods.

The male has a more pronounced dorsal fin.  The breeding pattern is typical of Cyprinids.  Live food, increased temperature and gradually increased lighting will help.  Soft water is essential.  Remove the parents after spawning.  Feed the fry brine shrimp.

(Moenkausia pittieri)
Diamond Tetra
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 20 gallons
Care Level: Moderate
Tank Conditions: 75-82F; pH 6.0-7.5; KH 4-8
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 2"
Color Form: Orange, Silver
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Carnivore, Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Venezuela
Family: Characidae

The Diamond Tetra, also known as Brillantsalmler, Diamond Characin, Pittier's Tetra and Timanttitetra is native to South American inland waters. They are said to sparkle like a diamond with their silvery scales and orange accents.

These Tetras prefer a heavily planted tank and softer water on the acidic side. They are ideal fish to put in a community tank and prefer to school with an odd number of at least 3 Diamond Tetras, making them an attractive addition to your home aquarium.

To breed them, separate a pair into a "breeding tank" with no lighting at first and then gradually increase it until spawning occurs. Water hardness should be less than 4 degrees and live food such as mosquito larvae are great inducers. Be sure to remove the adults after the eggs have been laid, as the adults will eat them. The eggs should hatch within 30 hours.

Diamond Tetras will accept many small foods such as brine shrimp or daphnia, freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex, micro pellet food, and a high quality flake food.

 Scientific Name:   Moenkhausia pittieri
 Family:   Characin
 Temperature:   24 - 28 C; 75 - 82 F
 PH   6.5
 Size:    6 cm; 2.5 inches
 Life Span:    5 years
 Breeding:    Normal, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Corydoras Catfish, Large Tetras,  Mollies, Platies, Plecostomus, Swordtails,  Zebra Danio
Emperor Tetra

The Emperor Tetra originates from streams and rivers in Colombia.  The lower half of the body is black/blue while the top half is creamy silver.  The fins can have a yellow appearance.  Emperors like a dark, well-planted aquariums and caves.  They also like open swimming space.  They don't school as readily as other tetras, but will do so if there are 6 or more.  They can undergo color changes, especially during breeding.  They eat flake foods, freeze dried bloodworms and brine shrimp.  

The female is lighter and the male has an extension of the black body line into the tail fin, which results in three points to it.  Emperors will scatter their adhesive eggs in heavily planted soft water.  Live foods, water changes and termperature changes may help bring about spawning.  Spawning can take several hours.  Eggs are scattered among fine leaved plants and the parents should be removed before the fry hatch.

(Impaichthys kerri)  Purple Emperor
Purple Emperor Tetra
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallon
Care Level: Moderate
Tank Conditions: 72-77F; pH 6.0-8.0; KH 4-8
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 1"
Color Form: Purple, Turquoise
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: South America
Family: Characidae

The Purple Emperor Tetra is a peaceful fish that can be housed in any community aquarium. Its fins are translucent and the tail has a unique look that will intrigue the beginner to the expert aquarist. Originally from South America, the Purple Emperor Tetra makes a great addition to the community aquarium.

The Purple Emperor Tetra can be in a housed with soft water fish to brackish water fish. Plants, rocks, and driftwood help to enhance its natural habitat and provide hiding places.

The Purple Emperor Tetra will breed occasionally in an aquarium setting and a hospital or "breeding tank" will be necessary. Slightly acidic water is best for optimal breeding habits. After spawning, remove the parents to prevent them from eating their offspring.

The Purple Emperor Tetra will accept many small foods such as brine shrimp or daphnia, freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex, micro pellet food, and a high quality flake food.

(Nematobrycon palmeri) Royal Black Emperor
Royal Black Emperor Tetra
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 20 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 73-79F; pH 5.0-8.0; KH 4-8
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 2"
Color Form: Black, Purple
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: South America
Family: Characidae

The Royal Black Emperor Tetra is a peaceful fish that can be housed in any community aquarium. Its fins are translucent and the pointed tail has a unique look that will intrigue the beginner to the expert aquarist. Originally from South America, this Tetra is arguably the most beautiful of all with a brilliant purple body.

The Royal Black Emperor Tetra can be housed in a community aquarium with soft or brackish water. Plants, rocks, and driftwood help to enhance its natural habitat and provide hiding places. This is a peaceful fish that the beginner to the expert aquarist would benefit from having. A group of at least six are recommended as they are schooling fish and will do best kept in groups.

The Royal Black Emperor Tetra will breed occasionally in an aquarium setting and a hospital or "breeding tank" will be necessary. Slightly acidic water is best for optimal breeding habits. After the eggs have been fertilized, remove the parents or they will eat the eggs. Feed fry baby brine shrimp or crushed flake food.

The Royal Black Emperor Tetra will accept many small foods such as brine shrimp or daphnia, freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex, micro pellet food, and a high quality flake food.

 Scientific Name:   Nematobrycon palmeri
 Family:   Characin
 Temperature:   23 - 27 C; 73 - 81 F
 PH   5.0 - 8.0
 Size:    5 cm;  2 inches
 Life Span:    5 years
 Breeding:    Difficult, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Corydoras Catfish, Large Tetras,  Mollies, Platies, Plecostomus, Swordtails,  Zebra Danio
Flame Tetra

The Flame Tetra originates from the Rio de Janeiro area of Brazil.  The coloring in pinkish/red and silver, with pink/red predominating in the back half.  Two dark vertical bars are apparent behind the gill covers.  The fins are edged in black.  A planted tank with floating plant cover, hiding places and open swimming space is preferred.   They are a typical schooling tetra and should be kept in groups of at least 6.  They eat flake foods, freeze dried bloodworms and brine shrimp.  Color is enhanced by a quality diet, soft water, breeding activity and lack of stress.

Soft, slightly acidic water is best for breeding and lighting should be greatly dimmed.  Tetras have adhesive eggs, so fine leaved plants should be used to catch the eggs.  The parents should be removed after spawning.  The fry will hatch within a couple of days and will survive several days on their yolk sac.  The fry should be fed brine shrimp and then finely ground flake foods.

 Scientific Name:   Hyphessobrycon flammeus
 Family:   Characin
 Temperature:   22 - 28 C; 72 - 82 F
 PH   5.8 - 7.8
 Size:    2.5 cm; 1 inch
 Life Span:    5 years
 Breeding:    Difficult, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Corydoras Catfish, Large Tetras,  Mollies, Platies, Plecostomus, Swordtails,  Zebra Danio

 
Glass Fish
 
 

 

The Glass Fish originated from brackish waters in India and Thailand.  It is also known as the Indian Glassy Fish, Glass Perch, Disco Fish and the Painted Glass Fish.  It is known by the scientific names Parambassis ranga and Parambassis baculis.  It has a translucent clear glass appearance and its internal bone structure is clearly visible. The body shape is similar to that of a Blackskirt Tetra.  Both of these species are unfortunately subjected to dyeing, as discussed below.  The Glass Fish should be kept in groups of 4 or more in large aquariums with heavy vegetation and rocks.  They are active and also require open swimming space.  The Glass Fish can be fed flake foods, but prefers live foods.  It will eat brine shrimp, wingless fruit flies, bloodworms, glass worms and tubifex worms.  The Glass Fish is difficult to breed.  Eggs are laid in nests that it builds or among plants.  Several hundred eggs can be laid and the young are guarded.

The Glass Fish is frequently injected with various fluorescent dyes using a large gauge needle.  In fact, “unpainted” varieties are rarely available.  The injections kill a large portion of the fish that are initially injected.  Others develop infections while the dye is lodged in their cells.  The small percentage of fish that survive will lose most of their coloration within 6 months. The practice of painting these fish has nearly eliminated the availability of the unpainted variety in the pet industry.  At Tim’s Tropicals we don’t sell any Glass Fish for this reason.  For more information, click on either of the graphics above.  For information on other dyed fish, link to the Blackskirt Tetra and the Blood Parrot

 Scientific Name:   Parambassis ranga
 Family:   Perch
 Temperature:   18 - 26 C; 68 - 79 F
 PH   7.0 - 8.0
 Size:    6 cm; 2.5 inches
 Life Span:    years
 Breeding:    Difficult, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Angelfish, Corydoras, Guppies, Harlequin Rasboras, Small Tetras, White Clouds
Glowlight Tetra

The Glowlight originates from Guyana in South America. It is a translucent peach color with a horizontal red/gold stripe from the eye to the tail.  The stripe broadens at the tail producing the glowing effect.  The belly is silver.  It is very similar to the Neon Tetra.  It is also know by the name Glowlite.  The Glowlight stays in the lower levels of the tank and should be kept in groups, with 8 being a recommended number.  Dim lighting produced by plant cover is desirable, but open space should be provided.  Peat can be added to soften the water. Glowlights will eat food flakes, freeze-dried bloodworms and live brine shrimp.  A healthy diet is essential in bringing out full coloring.

Typical of most tetras, the female is larger and broader, especially when laiden with eggs.  Glowlights scatter their eggs in heavily planted soft water.  Live foods and water changes will help bring about spawning.  Eggs are scattered among fine leaved plants and the parents should be removed before the fry hatch.

(Hemigrammus erythrozonus)
Glowlight Tetra
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallon
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-77F; pH 5.5-7.0; KH 4-8
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 2"
Color Form: Bright Red, Transparent
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised
Family: Characidae

The Glowlight Tetra is a very popular freshwater tetra, which originally came from the clear water streams of South America. This fish has a clear body with a bright neon red stripe running from the nose into the tail. When the lights on the aquarium are dimmed, the red stripe on the fish can be clearly seen which lends to its name. They are a great addition to any soft water community aquarium.

Glowlight Tetras add beauty to a planted aquarium; the plants, in turn, will provide hiding places for the fish. Rocks and driftwood also help to mirror its natural habitat. It thrives in slightly acidic water and will do best when water parameters are kept constant. The Glowlight Tetras are a schooling fish and will do best if kept in odd numbers of 5 or more.

To breed Glowlight Tetras, separate a pair into a "breeder tank" with no lighting at first, and then gradually increase it until spawning occurs. Water hardness should be less than 4 dKH and live food such as mosquito larvae are great inducers. Be sure to remove the adults after the eggs have been laid, as they will eat them. The eggs should hatch within 30 hours.

Glowlight Tetras will accept many small foods such as brine shrimp or daphnia, freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex, micro pellet food, and a high quality flake food.

 Scientific Name:   Hemigrammus erythrozonus
 Family:   Characin
 Temperature:   24 - 28 C; 75 - 82 F
 PH   6.0 - 8.0
 Size:    4 cm; 1.5 inches
 Life Span:    5 years
 Breeding:    Difficult, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Black Phantom Tetra, Cardinal Tetra, Corydoras Catfish, Ghost Shrimp, Glass Fish, Guppies, Harlequin Rasbora, Honey Gouramis, Ram Cichlid, Neon Tetra, White Cloud
Head-and-Tail-Light tetra

The Head-and-Tail-Light Tetra originates from stagnant waters in the Amazon basin area of South America.   They are an easy fish for beginners to care for.  They get their name from golden/red spot on their upper eye and gold in their tail that resemble a light.  Head-and-Tail-Light Tetras are also known as Beacon fish.  Their body is silver green, the lower fins tips are edged in white and there is a black spot on the tail.  They prefer dim lighting, so floating plant cover is a good idea.  They also like caves.  Typical of most tetras, the Head-and-Tail-Light also likes open space for swimming.  A group of 6 is recommended. They eat flake foods, freeze dried bloodworms and brine shrimp.

Females are distinguished by the typical tetra broad female body.  Prospective parents should be fed brine shrimp and placed in a well planted aquarium with fine leaved plants for the hundreds of adhesive eggs to stick to.  The water should be soft and the pH should be around 6.  The parents should be removed after spawning.  The fry will hatch within two days and can live off their yolk sac for 3 - 5 days.  The eggs can be light sensitive, so ensure the lighting is very dim to reduce the chance of fungus destroying the eggs.  The young can be fed brine shrimp and then finely ground flake foods.

(Hemigrammus ocellifer)
Head & Tail Light Tetra
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallon
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 64-82F; pH 5.8-8.5; KH 4-8
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 2"
Color Form: Gold, Pink, Silver
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised
Family: Characidae

The Head and Tail Light Tetra originates from the tributaries and rivers of South America and make a wonderful addition to any community aquarium. Their body is mostly transparent in color with the head and abdomen having a silver to gold coloration. These fish have a pinkish spot both on the base of the tail, and just behind the eyes, which gives them their name.

The Head and Tail Light Tetra can be housed in an aquarium with other soft water fish. Tetras are a schooling fish that work well in groups of six or more fish of the same species. Live plants, rocks and driftwood help to enhance its natural habitat and provide hiding spaces.

Head and Tail Light Tetras breed occasionally in an aquarium setting and a hospital or "breeding tank" will be necessary. During breeding time, the females will display a fuller looking belly, which help distinguish them from the males. Slightly acidic water is best for optimal breeding habits. After the eggs begin to hatch, 12 to 15 hours after being laid, removing the parents will reduce the number of lost fry.

The Head and Tail Light Tetra will accept many small foods such as brine shrimp or daphnia, freeze dried bloodworms and tubifex, micro pellet food, and a high quality flake food.

 Scientific Name:   Hemigrammus ocellifer
 Family:   Characin
 Temperature:   22 - 26 C; 72 - 79 F
 PH   6.0 - 8.0
 Size:    4 cm;   1.5 inches
 Life Span:    5 years
 Breeding:    Easy, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Corydoras Catfish, Large Tetras,  Mollies, Platies, Plecostomus, Swordtails,  Zebra Danio
Lemon Tetra
The Lemon Tetra originally came from the lower Amazon.  It is distinguished by red in its eye and a splash of yellow on the front of the adipose fin.  There is also a slender streak of yellow on the dorsal fin.  The overall color is greenish yellow.  A thin red line runs the length of the body and is underscored with black.  The lower body is silver.  It is not very active and will benefit greatly from a school of 8 - 10.   They combine nicely with other large tetras.  A varied diet including quality flakes and live brine shrimp will enhance its color.  Hard water will reduce its color.  It will often appear almost colorless while on retail display.

Males will "dance" in a territorial display toward other males and toward females.  Males are more colorful and females are slightly larger and broader.  For breeding, use a heavily planted tank with dim lighting and warmer water.  Place one or more females with the male.  The male will defend a territory which females usually enter during the morning.  Eggs will be scattered on plants over a number of days.  Remove the adults after breeding.  Eggs will hatch in 24 hours and the fry will be swimming in about 5 days.  Feed the fry infusoria or extremely small flakes.

 Scientific Name:   Hyphessobrycon pulchripinnis
 Family:   Characin
 Temperature:   23 - 28 C; 73 - 82 F
 PH   7
 Size:    4 cm; 1.5 inches
 Life Span:    5 years
 Breeding:    Difficult, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Corydoras Catfish, Large Tetras,  Mollies, Platies, Plecostomus, Swordtails,  Zebra Danio
 
Neon Tetra

This is one of the most popular aquarium fish because of its bright color.  The Neon originally came from the upper Amazon near Peru, where it occupied dark locations.  Neons have a stripe along the length of their body that changes between blue and green depending on the viewing angle.  It is differentiated from the Cardinal Tetra by the silver in the lower front half of the body, where the Cardinal continues to be red.  It is also very similar to the Glowlight Tetra.  The females have a slightly wider body and this will cause the stripe to appear to bend.  Neons are easier to transport than Cardinal Tetras, which accounts for their popularity.  They appreciate blackwater conditions, which refers to the soft dark water created by the accumulation of decaying leaves in slow moving and still waters.  This can be replicated by filtering through peat or by adding blackwater extract sold by suppliers such as Tetra.  This will turn the water an amber color. Neons should be kept in a school of at least 6 and the more you increase their numbers, the better the schooling effect. They will eat food flakes, spirulina, freeze-dried bloodworms and live foods, such as brine shrimp and bloodworms.

Neon Tetras will spawn if placed in acidic water.  The pair should be fed live food.  Peat or blackwater extract can be used to greatly increase the chances of success in breeding.  The tank should be covered from all light at night and then uncovered near dawn to induce spawning.  The parents should be removed after spawning.

For further information about breeding and about the Neon Tetra Disease, visit FishandTips.com

Neon Tetra Jumbo

(Paracheirodon innesi)
  Click here for a larger image
Neon Tetra Jumbo
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallon
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 68-74F; pH 5.0-7.0; KH 4-8
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 2"
Color Form: Neon Blue, Red, Turquoise
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised, Malaysia
Family: Characidae

This very popular freshwater tetra comes from the clear water streams of South America. Generally iridescent blue with a bright red tail, the Neon Tetra is a peaceful fish that will make a great addition to a community aquarium.

Neon Tetras add beauty to a planted aquarium; the plants in turn will provide plenty of hiding places and security for the fish. Rocks and driftwood also help to mirror its natural habitat. The Neon Tetra thrives in slightly acidic water and will do best when water parameters are kept constant.

To breed Neon Tetras, separate a pair into a "breeding tank" with no lighting at first, and gradually increase it until spawning occurs. Water hardness should be less than 4 degrees and live food such as mosquito larvae are great inducers. Be sure to remove the adults after the eggs have been laid, as the adults will eat them. The eggs should hatch within 30 hours.

Neon Tetras will accept many small foods such as brine shrimp or daphnia, freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex, micro pellet food, and a high quality flake food.

 Scientific Name:   Paracheirodon innesi
 Family:   Characin
 Temperature:   20 - 21 C; 68 - 79 F
 PH   6.5
 Size:    2.5 cm; 1 inch
 Life Span:    8 years
 Breeding:    Difficult, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Black Phantom Tetra, Cardinal Tetra, Corydoras Catfish, Ghost Shrimp, Glass Fish, Glow Light Tetra, Guppies, Honey Gouramis, Harlequin Rasbora, Ram Cichlid, White Cloud
Penguin Tetra
The Penguin Tetra originates from streams in Brazil. It is also know as the Penguin Fish and the Hockey Stick Tetra. It is predominantly white or olive with a thick black band running down the lateral line and into the lower half of the tail fin. The belly is silvery. The penguin gets its name from the fact that it swims in a partly upright position instead of the horizontal pattern typical of most fish.

Penguins are a good beginner fish as they are quite hardy and peaceful, though they will nip at the fins of slow moving tank mates. A dark substrate with bushy plants is recommended. Groups of 6 or more are best. The penguin eats standard flake foods and will enjoy the occasional live brine shrimp.

Feed Penguins live foods to bring on spawning. The females will be larger than the males. Combining several males and females is the best way to ensure a mating pair are combined. The tank bottom can be covered in java moss to catch the eggs. The female will release hundreds of eggs and these will hatch within 24 hours. The parents should be removed after spawning. The fry should be fed brine shrimp.

(Thayeria boehlkei)
Penguin Tetra
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 20 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 64-82F; pH 5.8-8.5; KH 4-8
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 3"
Color Form: Gold, Pale, White
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: South America
Family: Characidae

The Penguin Tetra comes from the tributaries and rivers of South America and make a wonderful addition to any community aquarium. They are pale to golden in color, and have a black vertical stripe that extends down the bottom half of the tail, giving an appearance similar to a penguin.

The Penguin Tetra can be housed in an aquarium with other soft water fish. Tetras are a schooling fish that work well in groups of six or more fish of the same species. Live plants, rocks and driftwood help to enhance its natural habitat and provide hiding spaces.

Penguin Tetras breed occasionally in an aquarium setting and a hospital or "breeding tank" will be necessary. During breeding time, the females will display a fuller looking belly, which help distinguish them from the males. Slightly acidic water is best for optimal breeding habits. After the eggs begin to hatch, 12 to 15 hours after being laid, removing the parents will reduce the number of lost fry.

The Penguin Tetra will accept many small foods such as brine shrimp or daphnia, freeze dried bloodworms and tubifex, micro pellet food, and a high quality flake food.

 Scientific Name:   Thayeria boehlkei
 Family:   Characin
 Temperature:   22 - 28 C; 72 - 82 F
 PH   6.0 - 8.0
 Size:    6 cm; 2.5 inches
 Life Span:    5 years
 Breeding:    Normal, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Black Skirt Tetra, Blind Cave Tetra, Bloodfin, Buenos Aires Tetra, Cherry Barb, Clown Loach, Congo Tetra, Diamond Tetra, Dwarf Gourami, Emperor Tetra, Flame Tetra, GloFish, Harlequin Rasbora, Head-and-Tail-Light Tetra, Iridescent Shark, Kuhli Loach, Lemon Tetra, Molly, Otto Catfish, Pearl Gourami, Platy, Red Eye Tetra, Red Tailed Shark, Rosy Barb, Sailfin Molly, Serpae Tetra, Silver Dollar, Silver Hatchetfish, Silver Tip Tetra, Swordtail, Zebra Danio
Pristella Tetra
The Pristella Tetra originates from the Amazon and Orinoco Rivers of South America.  It is also known by the common name X-Ray Tetra.  It is known by the scientific names Pristella maxillaris and Pristella Riddlei. The Pristella has a distinctive black band on its dorsal fin with white above the band and yellow/white below it.  The tail can have a hint of orange/red.  The body is translucent, giving rise to the name X-Ray, but many sold today appear more solid bodied.  There is also an albino version, which is sometimes referred to as the Golden X-Ray.

Pristellas are good beginner fish.  They are hardy and resistant to temperature change and fluctuating water quality.  They do not require the soft acidic water typical of many other tetras.  Pristellas are shy and will be quite nervous among larger fish. They should be kept in groups of 6 or more.  They will school loosely when they feel safe and tightly when they feel threatened.  Low light levels with plants and driftwood to hide among are recommended.  Pristellas eat small flake foods, spirulina flakes, freeze dried bloodworms and live foods, such as brine shrimp.

Males will tend to be slimmer than females.  A pair should be separated and fed live foods prior to spawning. Pristellas will scatter hundreds of eggs among plants.  The parents should be removed after spawning.  The fry are very small and will require live artemia brine shrimp.

 Scientific Name:   Pristella maxillaris
 Family:   Characin
 Temperature:   23 - 28 C; 73 - 80 F
 PH   6.0 - 8.0
 Size:    4 cm; 1.5 inches
 Life Span:    5 years
 Breeding:    Difficult, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Black Neon Tetra, Black Phantom Tetra, Cardinal Tetra, Corydoras Catfish, Dwarf Gourami, Dwarf Neon Rainbow, Flame Tetra, Flying Fox, GloFish, Glowlight Tetra, Guppy, Harlequin Rasbora, Head-and-Tail-Light Tetra, Kuhli Loach, Lemon Tetra, Molly, Neon Tetra, Otto Catfish, Platy, Pleco (Common), Ram Cichlid, Red Eye Tetra, Sailfin Molly, Silver Hatchetfish, Sparkling Gourami, Swordtail, Upsidedown Catfish, White Cloud, Zebra Danio

1-20
 
21-

Red Base or Bloodtail Tetra
Red Eye Tetra
The Red Eye Tetra or Red Eyed Tetra originates from Brazil and Paraguay.  It is a good beginner's fish.  It has a bright red spot over the eye and a broad vertical black band at the base of the tail.  The body is silver or golden.  It is also known as the Lamp Eye Tetra.  The scientific names Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae and Moenkhausia oligolepis are both used to describe Red Eye Tetras.

Tetras prefer dim lighting, which can be achieved through plant cover.  Opens spaces and hiding places are both desired.  Red Eye Tetras are a typical schooling tetra and should be kept in groups of at least 6.  They tend to nip at fins and at plants.  They are definitely not good companions for smaller tetras and guppies.  Red Eyes eat flake foods, freeze dried bloodworms and brine shrimp.

The female is broader, especially when laden with eggs.  When kept in groups, they will pair up.  Soft, slightly acidic water is best for breeding and lighting should be greatly dimmed.  Pairs should be separated for more than a week before breeding and fed a variety of foods.  Tetras have adhesive eggs, so fine leaved plants should be used to catch the eggs.  The parents should be removed after spawning.  The fry will hatch within 2 days and will survive several days on their yolk sac.  The fry should be fed brine shrimp and then finely ground flake foods.

 Scientific Name:   Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae
 Family:   Characin
 Temperature:   22 - 26 C; 72 - 79 F
 PH   6.0 - 8.0
 Size:    7 cm; 3 inches
 Life Span:    5 years
 Breeding:    Normal, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Corydoras Catfish, Large Tetras,  Mollies, Platies, Plecostomus, Swordtails,  Zebra Danio
Red Phantom Tetra
 

The Red Phantom originates from the Orinoco River basin in South America. It was formerly known by the scientific name Megalamphodus sweglesi. The Red Phantom is very similar to the Black Phantom, even though it does not come from the same area. The Red Phantom has a transparent red body but the color will vary in intensity depending on diet and breeding activity. The dorsal fin is black for both sexes with white tipping for females. The dorsal fin is not as pronounced as it is on the Black Phantom. There is a dark shoulder mark on both species. The Red Phantom prefers lots of plants, driftwood and rocks. It is a timid, slow moving tetra and will school for security. Groups of 6 or more are recommended. Fast swimming tank mates are not a good combination with Red Phantoms. Similar to the Black Phantom, they will twist and turn around each other in intricate displays. They will eat food flakes, spirulina, freeze-dried bloodworms and live foods, such as brine shrimp and bloodworms. A healthy diet is essential in bringing out full coloring.

Red Phantoms are very difficult to breed. They spawn in thick bundles of plants and require very soft, acidic water. Up to 400 eggs can be laid and they hatch in about a day. The eggs are susceptible to fungus.

 Scientific Name:   Hyphessobrycon sweglesi 
 Family:   Characin
 Temperature:   20 - 26 C; 68 - 80 F
 PH   5.5 - 7.5
 Size:    4 cm; 1.5 inches
 Life Span:    5 years
 Breeding:    Difficult, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Black Phantom Tetra, Cardinal Tetra, Corydoras Catfish, Discus, Dwarf Neon Rainbow, Endlers Livebearer, Glass Catfish, Glass Fish, Glowlight Tetra, Guppy, Harlequin Rasbora, Honey Gourami, Kuhli Loach, Neon Tetra, Pristella Tetra, Ram Cichlid, Silver Hatchetfish, White Cloud
Rummynose Tetra
The Rummynose Tetra originates from South America. It is also known by the common name of the Firehead Tetra. The Rummynose has a distinctive bright red area around its “nose” and over its eyes. The rest of the body is a silver/gold color. The caudal fin has horizontal black and white stripes. The red nose will disappear when the fish is stressed.

The name Rummynose is applied to three species, but for all intents and purposes, they are indistinguishable. According to an excellent article by Randy Carey at  Randy's Aquaria the distinctions are:

  • Petitella georgiae lacks a black spot at the top of the caudal penduncle, but has a heavy black line running into the body from the caudal fin.

  • Hemigrammus Rhodostomus has a lighter black line running into the body from the caudal fin.

  • Hemigrammus bleheri has no black running from the tail into the body.

Petitella georgiae is also referred to as the False Rummynose. Hemigrammus bleheri and Hemigrammus Rhodostomus are both black water fish that prefer soft water.

Rummynose are not a good beginners fish. They are susceptible to disease and suffer from poor water quality. Rummynose are very active and enjoy schooling in the mid levels of a tank. They should be kept in groups of at least 6. A well planted tank with low light levels is recommended. Rummynose eat quality flake foods, spirulina flakes, freeze dried bloodworms and live foods, such as brine shrimp.

Males will tend to be slimmer and smaller than females, but they are difficult to distinguish. Rummynose are extremely difficult to breed. Soft water should be used. A pair should be separated and fed live foods prior to spawning. They will scatter hundreds of eggs among plants. The parents should be removed after spawning. The fry hatch after about one day. The fry are very small and will require live artemia brine shrimp.

(Hemigrammus rhodostomus)
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True Rummynose Tetra
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallon
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-77F; pH 5.5-7.0; KH 2-6
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 2"
Color Form: Red, Silver
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: South America
Family: Characidae

Also known as the Banded Rummy-Nose Tetra, this fish comes from South America. It has a black tail, which is striped with white, and a silver body. The Rummy-Nose Tetra gets its name from the red blushing nose and face. This species is often confused with H. bleheri, which has a more silver body with no black stripe entering the body from the tail. A peaceful fish that will be a good addition to any community aquarium.

The Rummy-Nose Tetra can be housed in a community aquarium. Plants, rocks, and driftwood help to enhance its natural habitat and provide hiding spaces. The Rummy-Nose Tetra is a peaceful fish that the beginner to the expert aquarist would benefit from having.

These will breed occasionally in an aquarium setting and a hospital or "breeding tank" will be necessary to rear the fry. Slightly acidic water is best for optimal breeding habits. After the eggs begin to hatch, removing the parents will be necessary to reduce the number of lost fry.

The Rummy-Nose Tetra will accept many small foods such as brine shrimp or daphnia, freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex, micro pellet food, and high quality flake food.

 Scientific Name:   Hemigrammus bleheri
 Family:   Characin
 Temperature:   23 - 26 C; 73 - 79 F
 PH   5.0 - 6.0
 Size:    4 cm; 1.5 inches
 Life Span:    3 - 5 years
 Breeding:    Difficult, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Blind Cave Tetra, Buenos Aires Tetra, Corydoras Catfish, Dwarf Gourami, Dwarf Neon Rainbow, Featherfin Squeaker, Flying Fox, Glass Catfish, GloFish, Kuhli Loach, Molly, Otto Catfish, Penguin Tetra, Platy, Pleco (Common), Sailfin Molly, Serpae Tetra, Silver Hatchetfish, Silver Tip Tetra, Swordtail, Upsidedown Catfish, Zebra Danio
Serpae Tetra
The Serpae Tetra originates from Guyana and the Amazon River basin in South America.   It is known by the scientific Hyphessobrycon serpae and also by the name Hyphessobrycon eques and Hyphessobrycon callistus.  The body varies between a light red/brown to darker reddish shades. The dorsal fin is predominantly black.  The lower fins are red and can be tipped in white.  There is usually, but not always, a black spot behind the gills.  Their colors become greatly enhanced when they dispute territories among themselves and they will dance around each other in a beautiful display of motion and color.

Serpaes like the surface area of the tank and appreciate long stemmed plants.  Dimmed lighting is also preferred, which can be achieved through plant cover.  They are a typical schooling tetra and should be kept in groups of at least 6.  They are one of the more aggressive tetras and can have a tendency to nip fins, especially with other serpaes.  They should be kept with aggressive larger tetras, such as the Blind Cave Tetra, the Buenos Aires Tetra, the Colombian Tetra and the Silver Tip Tetra.  They are definitely not good companions for smaller tetras and guppies.  They eat flake foods, freeze dried bloodworms and brine shrimp.

The female is larger, paler and broader, especially when laden with eggs.  Soft, slightly acidic water is best for breeding and lighting should be greatly dimmed.  Pairs should be separated for more than a week before breeding and fed a variety of foods.  Tetras have adhesive eggs, so fine leaved plants should be used to catch the eggs.  The parents should be removed after spawning.  The fry will hatch within 2 days and will survive several days on their yolk sac.  The fry should be fed brine shrimp and then finely ground flake foods.

 Scientific Name:   Hyphessobrycon serpae
 Family:   Characin
 Temperature:   22 - 26 C; 72 - 79 F
 PH   5.0 - 7.8
 Size:    4 cm; 1.5 inches
 Life Span:    5 years
 Breeding:    Easy, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Blind Cave Tetra, Buenos Aires Tetra, Corydoras Catfish, Large Tetras,  Mollies, Platies, Plecostomus, Silver Tip Tetra, Swordtails,  Zebra Danio
Silver Dollar
The Silver Dollar originates from South America in the Amazon and Orinoco River basins.  It is related to the pacu and the piranha, but is not an aggressive flesh eater. The Silver Dollar is known by a variety of scientific names including Metynnis argenteus, Metynnis hypsauchen, Metynnis lippincottianus, Myleus rubripinnis and Mylossoma aureum.  The most commonly sold Silver Dollar is Metynnis argenteus.  It has a flat width and a round outline resembling a silver dollar.  The body is silver, but develops spots below the surface.  Anal fins on the male can be tipped in red.  Given their size and a need for a school of 4 or more, an aquarium of over 30 gallons with open swimming space is best. Lighting should be subdued.  They can accept variations in water quality.

Silver dollars are generally plant eaters.  They will eat flake foods, floating pellets, live soft plants and small live fish (like guppies).  When they are large in size, they can hold their own with New World Cichlids.

Breeding is difficult.  A large, shallow tank should be used and results may be better if schools are bred.  Hundreds of eggs can be released.  The parents should be removed after spawning.  The fry hatch in a couple of days and are free swimming in a week.

 Scientific Name:   Metynnis argenteus
 Family:   Characin
 Temperature:   24 - 28 C; 75 - 83 F
 PH   6.0 - 7.2
 Size:    14 cm; 5.5 inches
 Life Span:    10 years
 Breeding:    Difficult, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Angelfish, Arawana, Bala Sharks, Clown Loaches, Gouramis , Mollies, Pacus, Rainbows, Swordtails, other “Silver Dollar” varieties and New World Cichlids.
Silver Hatchet Fish

The Silver Hatchetfish originates in still water from Brazil to Argentina. They are known by the scientific name Thoracocharax stellatus and also by the name Gasteropelecus securis.   They have an extended lower body with a shape reminiscent of a pelican.  This extended area has large silver scales.  The pectoral fins are very long and the dorsal area is flat, which helps them skim the surface of the water.  The back is olive brown.  Silver Hatchets are one of the best jumpers in the tropical fish world.  In the wild they are able to catch flying insects.  You can hear them splashing in the water regularly.  If the tank is not covered, they will frequently jump out.  You also need to ensure they can't jump in to an external filter.  They are schooling fish and should be kept in groups.  Tank mates should be peaceful and occupy the lower levels of the aquarium.  Silver Hatchets will eat flake foods, blood worms and brine shrimp.

Females are larger than males.  They have not been bred successfully.  Silver Hatchets aren't recommended for beginners. 

 Scientific Name:   Thoracocharax stellatus
 Family:   Hatchetfish
 Temperature:   24 - 30 C; 75 - 86 F
 PH   6.0 - 7.0
 Size:    7 cm; 3 inches
 Life Span:    ? years
 Breeding:    Difficult, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Angelfish, Apistogramma, Corydoras, Discus, Tetras, Loricarids, small Doradids, Killifish, African tetras (Alestids)
Silver Tip Tetra
Silver Tip Tetras originate from Brazil.  They are known by the scientific names Hasemania nana, Hasemania melanura and Memigrammus nanus.  They are a hardy, very active and colorful fish.  The body varies from silver in females to yellow/copper in males.  The tail has a broad black line.  The fins are yellow and tipped in white.  Silver Tips don't have an adipose fin (the small one, on top, just before the tail).  Their colors become enhanced when well fed, unstressed and ready to breed.

Tetras prefer dim lighting, which can be achieved through plant cover.  Opens spaces and hiding places are both desired.  Silver Tip Tetras are a typical schooling tetra and should be kept in groups of at least 6.  They are one of the more active, aggressive tetras and can have a tendency to nip fins, including other Silver Tips when their numbers are low.  They should be kept with aggressive larger tetras, such as the Blind Cave Tetra, the Colombian Tetra, the Serpae Tetra and the Buenos Aires Tetra.  They are definitely not good companions for smaller tetras and guppies.  Silver Tips eat flake foods, freeze dried bloodworms and brine shrimp.

The female is easy to distinguish by its paler color and the broadness of the body when laden with eggs.  Soft, slightly acidic water is best for breeding and lighting should be greatly dimmed.  Pairs should be separated for more than a week before breeding and fed a variety of foods.  Tetras have adhesive eggs, so fine leaved plants should be used to catch the eggs.  The parents should be removed after spawning.  The fry will hatch within 2 days and will survive several days on their yolk sac.  The fry should be fed brine shrimp and then finely ground flake foods.

(Hasemania nana)
Silver Tip Tetra
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallon
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 64-82F; pH 5.8-8.5; KH 4-8
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 2"
Color Form: Black, Gold
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised
Family: Characidae

The Silver Tip Tetra originates from the tributaries and rivers of South America and makes a wonderful addition to any community aquarium. Their body is mostly gold in color, except for the base of the tail, which has a black color that extends into the tail. The tips of the fins are colored white or silver giving this fish its name.

The Silver Tip Tetra can be housed in a aquarium with other soft water fish. Tetras are a schooling fish that work well in groups of six or more fish of the same species. Live plants, rocks and driftwood help to enhance its natural habitat and provide hiding spaces.

Silver Tip Tetras breed occasionally in an aquarium setting and a hospital or "breeding tank" will be necessary. During breeding time, the females will display a fuller looking belly, which help distinguish them from the males. Slightly acidic water is best for optimal breeding habits. After the eggs begin to hatch, 12 to 15 hours after being laid, removing the parents will reduce the number of lost fry.

The Silver Tip Tetra will accept many small foods such as brine shrimp or daphnia, freeze dried bloodworms and tubifex, micro pellet food, and a high quality flake food.

Ideal tank mates include: Tetras, Rasboras, Danios, Dwarf Gouramis, Discus, Angelfish, Livebearers, Plecos, and small Scavenger Catfish.

 Scientific Name:   Hasemania nana
 Family:   Characin
 Temperature:   22 - 28 C; 72 - 82 F
 PH   6.0 - 8.0
 Size:    2.5 cm; 1 inch
 Life Span:    5 years
 Breeding:    Difficult, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Black Skirt Tetra, Blind Cave Tetra, Buenos Aires Tetra, Corydoras Catfish, Mollies, Platies, Plecostomus, Serpae Tetra, Swordtails,  Zebra Danio

Green Fire Tetra

(Aphyocharax rathbuni)
Green Fire Tetra
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallon
Care Level: Moderate
Tank Conditions: 72-80F; pH 6.6-7.0; KH 4-8
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 2"
Color Form: Green, Orange, Yellow
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: South America
Family: Characidae

The Green Fire Tetra comes from the clear waters of South America. This species is a translucent green color with a black patch on the dorsal fin, and a red/orange underbelly. This species does best in small groups of at least six or more.

In at least a 10-gallon aquarium, plants, rocks, and some driftwood should be used to give this species hiding places and security. They require a steady slightly acidic pH and constant temperature. They are mid-level swimming fish so taller plants are ideal.

In the aquarium, the white tips on the dorsal, pelvic, and pectoral fins can identify the male. The female lays a relatively small number of eggs, which hatch in about 24 hours after fertilization. This can happen frequently in an aquarium when large numbers of Green Fire Tetras are present. To avoid losing the fry, a separate "breeding tank" should be used, and the adults removed after spawning to prevent them from eating there offspring.

The Green Fire Tetra will accept many small foods such as brine shrimp or daphnia, freeze dried bloodworms and tubifex, micro pellet food, and a high quality flake food.

Gold Neon Tetra

(Paracheirodon innesi)
Gold Neon Tetra
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallon
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-77F; pH 5.5-7.0; KH 4-8
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 1"
Color Form: Gold, Red, Turquoise
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: South America
Family: Characidae

This very popular freshwater tetra originally came from the clear water streams of South America. Through selective breeding, the Gold Neon Tetra was developed. This fish has typical markings of the Neon Tetra, except with a gold body, and not as intense blue and red stripes.

Gold Neon Tetras add beauty to a planted aquarium; the plants, in turn, will provide hiding places for the fish. Rocks and driftwood also help to mirror its natural habitat. It thrives in slightly acidic water and will do best when water parameters are kept constant.

To breed Gold Neon Tetras, separate a pair into a "breeder tank" with no lighting at first, and then gradually increase it until spawning occurs. Water hardness should be less than 4 degrees and live food such as mosquito larvae are great inducers. Be sure to remove the adults after the eggs have been laid, as they will eat them. The eggs should hatch within 30 hours.

Gold Neon Tetras will accept many small foods such as brine shrimp or daphnia, freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex, micro pellet food, and a high quality flake food.

Splashing Tetra

(Copella arnoldi)
Splashing Tetra
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 73-79F; pH 5.0-8.0; KH 4-8
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 3"
Color Form: Gold, Silver
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: South America
Family: Lebiasinidae

The Splashing Tetra is a peaceful fish that can be housed in any community aquarium. The body is long and slender and is gold/silver in color. The males of this species have longer fins and are slightly larger than their female counterpart. The fins of the male also exhibit more color with red and black outlines. This fish gets its name from their breeding behavior. When breeding, both the male and the female leave the water and lay their eggs on an overhanging plant. While the eggs are maturing, the male splashes water on them to keep them from drying out.

The Splashing Tetra can be housed in a community aquarium with soft or brackish water. Plants, rocks, and driftwood help to enhance its natural habitat and provide hiding places. This is a peaceful fish that the beginner to the expert aquarist would benefit from having. A tight sealed top is a must with these fish, as they do jump.

The Splashing Tetra will breed occasionally in an aquarium setting and a hospital or "breeding tank" will be necessary. Slightly acidic water is best for optimal breeding habits. When the time comes to spawn, both the male and female will jump to an overhanging leaf that is out of the water. They use their fins to clamp on to the leaf, and the female will lay her eggs on the leaf with the male fertilizing them shortly after. After the eggs have been fertilized, the male will remain at the surface of the water where he keeps the eggs moist by splashing water on them. The eggs will then hatch in approximately 2 days at which time the fry will fall back into the water.

The Splashing Tetra will accept many small foods such as brine shrimp or daphnia, freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex, micro pellet food, and a high quality flake food.

Gold Tetra

(Rachoviscus crassiceps)
Gold Tetra
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallon
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-77F; pH 6.0-6.5; KH 4-8
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 1"
Color Form: Gold, Tan
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised
Family: Characidae

The Gold Tetra is captive raised and originates from South America. These are small peaceful fish that have a rounded blunt appearance. The coloration of this fish is tan or gold, and is glittered with many gold flecks that reflect in the light. This is a good choice for the community aquarium.

Gold Tetras require an established planted aquarium of 10 gallons or more. They should be kept in schools of 8-10 and in an aquarium with other small, peaceful fish.

The Gold Tetras generally spawn on the undersides of broad-leaved plants. A breeding tank with shallow, warm, acidic, soft water with broad-leaved plants should be set up. The males of this species have hooklets and white edged fins. The females are smaller than the males, making identification easy. After spawning, remove the parents and keep the aquarium dark until the eggs hatch (after about 24 hours). Feed the fry infusoria.

An omnivore, Gold Tetras do well on a diet of prepared flake food, as well as freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex.

Diamond Head Neon Tetra

(Paracheirodon innesi)
Diamond Head Neon Tetra
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallon
Care Level: Moderate
Tank Conditions: 72-80F; pH 6.6-7.0; KH 4-8
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 2"
Color Form: Red, Silver, Turquoise
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: South America
Family: Characidae

The Diamond Head Neon Tetra comes from the clear waters of South America. The Diamond Head variety of Paracheirodon innesi has been developed through selective breeding. This variety of Neon has a metallic "diamond" patch on the fishes back between the eyes and dorsal fin. This variety of neon can be identified by the bright blue stripe, offset by red, that runs horizontally down the side of their body.

In at least a 10-gallon aquarium, plants, rocks, and some driftwood should be used to give the Diamond Head Neon Tetra hiding places and security. These are mid-level swimming fish, so taller plants should be used. They require a steady slightly acidic pH and constant temperature.

In the aquarium, the female lays a relatively small number of eggs, which hatch in about 24 hours after fertilization. This can happen frequently if large numbers of Diamond Head Neon Tetras are present. To avoid loosing the fry, a separate "breeding tank" should be used.

The Diamond Head Neon Tetra will accept many small foods such as brine shrimp or daphnis, freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex, micro pellet food, and a high quality flake food.

Red Tail Mirror Blue Tetra

(Hyphessobrycon sp.)
Red Tail Mirror Blue Tetra
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 20 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-77F; pH 6.0-6.5; KH 4-8
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 2"
Color Form: Blue, Red, Turquoise
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: South America
Family: Characidae

The Red Tail Mirror Blue Tetra gets its name from its bright red tail, and its reflective body. Perfect for the community aquarium, this hardy Tetra will be a great choice for the beginner to the expert aquarist.

A planted aquarium of at least 20 gallons will be the ideal environment for the Red Tail Mirror Tetra. Rocks and driftwood help mirror its natural habitat and will help to reduce stress on this fish. This species does best with soft slightly acidic water with high filtration.

Red Tail Mirror Blue Tetras will breed occasionally in an aquarium setting and a hospital or "breeding tank" will be necessary. Slightly acidic water is best for optimal breeding habits. After spawning remove the parents or they will eat their offspring.

The Red Tail Mirror Blue Tetra will accept many small foods such as brine shrimp or daphnia, freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex, micro pellet food, and a high quality flake food.

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