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Sparkling Gourami

(Trichopsis pumilus)
Sparkling Gourami
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallon
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-78F; pH 6.0-7.0; KH 4-8
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 1"
Color Form: Blue, Green, Iridescent, Red
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Cambodia, Tank Bred, Thailand
Family: Belontiidae

The Sparkling Gourami is also known as the Pygmy Gourami and is a shy and peaceful fish. They are native to the shallow waters of the rice patties in Thailand and Cambodia, and can be kept in a small shallow aquarium. They are also able to cope with very low oxygen levels. It only reaches a total length of 1-1/2" and is adorned with blue and green spots. A darker band and many dark spots cover the body of these fish.

The Sparkling Gourami can be housed with a variety of tank mates that are of similar size and temperament. While males can be territorial with each other, they become timid around other, more aggressive fish. The ideal tank set-up would be an aquarium of a minimum of 10 gallons and have plenty of live plants as well as rocks and driftwood for use as hiding places.

The only way to differentiate the male from the female Sparkling Gourami is by illuminating the fish with bright light and looking for the ovaries of the female. When ready to breed, the male builds a bubblenest and then begins to entice the female by swimming back and forth, flaring his fins and raising his tail. When this behavior is noticed, the water level should be reduced to 6 inches. After spawning the female should be removed to a separate aquarium as the male may become aggressive toward her. The male will tend to the eggs until they hatch, and after hatching, there should be frequent water changes, especially during the third week, as this is when the labyrinth organ is developing. The fry should be fed infusoria and nauplii.

The Sparkling Gourami is an omnivore and requires both algae-based foods as well as meaty foods. An algae-based flake food, along with freeze-dried bloodworms, tubiflex, and brine shrimp will provide these fish with the proper nutrition.

Neon Blue Dwarf Gourami

(Colisa lalia)
  Click here for a larger image
Neon Blue Dwarf Gourami
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallon
Care Level: Moderate
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 6.0-7.5; KH 4-10
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 2"
Color Form: Iridescent, Turquoise
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised, Malaysia
Family: Belontiidae

The Neon Blue Dwarf Gourami, is a color variation of the Dwarf Gourami, and is a peaceful, shy fish. If in a pair the two fish will swim together. The Neon Blue Dwarf Gourami has a bright iridescent sheen to its body, more prominent in the male. The coloration of the male is a vivid turquoise blue with orange-red stripes. Neon Blue Dwarf Gouramis are considered Labyrinth Fish, meaning they breathe directly from the air, and must have access to the surface.

Neon Blue Dwarf Gouramis require a tank that is 10 gallons or larger. The aquarium should be heavily planted and have at least part of the surface covered with floating plants. A darker substrate will help show-off the gourami's colors, and peat filtration is recommended. Regular water changes are a must, as this gourami can be susceptible to disease. They should not be kept with large, aggressive fish, but would enjoy the company of other small, peaceful fish as well as fellow gouramis. Loud noises often scare them, so the tank should be in a quiet area.

The Neon Blue Dwarf Gourami is a bubble nest builder that uses plants to help bind together the bubbles. Besides the difference in color, the sex can be determined by the dorsal fin. The male's dorsal fin is pointed, the female's is rounded. The water level should be reduced to 8 inches during spawning, and the temperature should be approximately 82F. After spawning the female should be moved to a different tank. The male will tend to the eggs and fry, and when the fry are 2-3 days old the male should also be removed. When first hatched, the fry should be fed infusoria, and later, brine shrimp and finely ground flakes. Freeze-dried tablets may also be fed to older fry.

The Neon Blue Dwarf Gouramis are an omnivore and prefers both algae-based foods as well as meaty foods. An algae-based flake food, along with freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex, and brine shrimp will provide these fish with the proper nutrition.

Dwarf Gourami

(Colisa lalia)
Dwarf Gourami
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallon
Care Level: Moderate
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 6.0-7.5; KH 4-10
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 2"
Color Form: Orange, Turquoise
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Bramaputra, Ganges, Jumna
Family: Belontiidae

The Dwarf Gourami, also known as the Powder Blue Dwarf Gourami, the Red Dwarf Gourami, and the Neon Blue Dwarf Gourami, is a peaceful, shy fish. If in a pair the two fish will swim together. The Dwarf Gourami has an iridescent sheen to its body, more prominent in the male. The male is a vivid orange-red with turquoise blue vertical stripes that continue into the fins. Females are pale, silvery blue-gray with very faint yellowish vertical stripes. Dwarf Gouramis are considered Labyrinth Fish, meaning they breathe directly from the air, and must have access to the surface.

Dwarf Gouramis require a tank that is 10 gallons or larger. The aquarium should be heavily planted and have at least part of the surface covered with floating plants. A darker substrate will help show-off the gourami's colors, and peat filtration is recommended. Regular water changes are a must, as this gourami can be susceptible to disease. They should not be kept with large, aggressive fish, but are compatible with other small, peaceful fish as well as fellow gouramis. Loud noises often scare them, so the tank should be in a quiet area.

The Dwarf Gourami is a bubblenest builder that uses plants to help bind together the bubbles. Besides the difference in color, the sex can be determined by the dorsal fin. The male's dorsal fin is pointed, while the female's is rounded. The water level should be reduced to 8 inches during spawning, and the temperature should be approximately 82F. After spawning the female should be moved to a different tank. The male will tend to the eggs and fry, and when the fry are 2-3 days old the male should also be removed. When first hatched, the fry should be fed infusoria, and later, brine shrimp and finely ground flakes. Freeze-dried tablets may also be fed to older fry.

The Dwarf Gourami is an omnivore and prefers both algae-based foods as well as meaty foods. An algae-based flake food, along with freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex, and brine shrimp will provide these fish with the proper nutrition.

Honey Dwarf Gourami

(Colisa sota)
Honey Dwarf Gourami
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallon
Care Level: Difficult
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 6.0-7.5; KH 4-10
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 2"
Color Form: Gold, Yellowish to Brown
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Assam, Bangladesh, North Eastern India
Family: Belontiidae

The Honey Dwarf Gourami is sometimes called the Honey Gourami, the Sunburst Gourami or the Dwarf Gourami, and is closely related to the Colisa lalia Dwarf Gourami. Both the male and female are pale yellow-brown in color, except during spawning. When spawning the male becomes honey to ochre in color with a blue throat and black on the front of the anal fin. The Honey Dwarf Gourami is a Labyrinth Fish and must have access to the surface of the tank so it can breathe.

The Honey Dwarf Gourami requires a tank of at least 10 gallons that is heavily planted and has a good cover of floating plants. Their ideal tank mates should be smaller, peaceful, and gentle. The Honey Dwarf Gourami does become territorial during spawning.

A pair of Honey Dwarf Gouramis will defend their territory during spawning. The male will build a bubblenest, but the pair may spawn before the nest is built. After spawning the female should be moved to a different tank. The larvae hatch in 24-36 hours and are free-swimming after approximately one day. The male will tend to the eggs and fry, and when the fry are 2-3 days old the male should also be removed. When first hatched, the fry should be fed infusoria, and later, brine shrimp and finely ground flakes. Freeze-dried tablets may also be fed to older fry.

The Honey Dwarf Gourami is an omnivore and prefers both algae-based foods as well as meaty foods. An algae-based flake food, along with freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex, and brine shrimp will provide these fish with proper nutrition.

Pearl Gourami

(Trichogaster leeri)
Pearl Gourami
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 75-86F; pH 6.5-8.0; KH 5-18
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 4"
Color Form: Iridescent, Pearly
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Borneo, Malaysia, Sumatra
Family: Belontiidae

The Pearl Gourami is a peaceful fish that is also known as the Leeri or Lace Gourami. It is one of the most attractive, hardiest, and easy-to-keep gouramis. The body is stretched out and laterally compressed with ventral fins that are long and thin, having the look of feelers. It is covered with iridescent pearl and brown flecks that give it a mother of pearl appearance. There is a horizontal black line that runs from the lips to the tail, where it ends with a spot. The Pearl Gourami is a Labyrinth Fish. Fish in this group breathe directly from the air and must have access to the surface of the tank.

The Pearl Gourami requires a 30 gallon or larger tank with water approximately 12 inches deep, and a covering of floating ferns that may be used as hiding places. The substrate should be dark and the light subdued. The ideal tank mates for the Pearl Gourami would be similar in size and temperament. They should not be housed with aggressive tank mates, like Cichlids. They will hide in a corner, begin to loose color and may refuse to eat if kept with overly aggressive fish.

It is easy to tell the male from the female because he has extended, pointed dorsal and anal fins, and is more red. Prior to breeding, the pair should be fed live or frozen brine shrimp and worms for conditioning. The water temperature should also be raised to 80F. When breeding, the water level in the tank should be reduced to 4-5 inches. The male will build a bubblenest under which spawning will take place. After spawning the female should be moved to a separate tank. The male Pearl Gourami tends to the eggs, and once the fry are hatched, the male should also be removed.

The fry should be fed liquid food or infusoria culture several times a day. At approximately two weeks, freshly hatched (or frozen) brine shrimp may be offered to the fry. When the fry reach approximately one month, fine flake foods may be offered. Water should be changed every two to three days, and as the fry grow larger, they should be distributed between several tanks to reduce lethal build up of wastes.

The Pearl Gourami is an omnivore and prefers both-algae based foods as well as meaty foods. An algae-based flake food, along with freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex, and brine shrimp will provide these fish with the proper nutrition.

Blue Paradise

(Macropodus opercularis)
  Click here for a larger image
Blue Paradise
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 61-79F; pH 6.0-8.0; KH 4-18
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 4"
Color Form: Orange, Turquoise
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Eastern Asia
Family: Belontiidae

The Blue Paradise, also known as the Paradise Fish, is a brightly colored member of the Labyrinth Fish group. The body has alternating turquoise blue and orange stripes that extend into the fins and tail. There is a spot on the gills, and a pattern of dark scaling on the head reaching over the back and fading as it goes down the back. The fins and tail have a feather-like appearance, like that of a Betta. The Blue Paradise is a good jumper, so a tight fitting lid is a must.

The Blue Paradise requires a larger aquarium, at least 30 gallons, with lots of hiding places for the female. It will not eat plants, but because of its active courtship and mock battles between tank mates, only very hardy vegetation is advised. The Blue Paradise is a territorial fish that will defend its area from its tank mates. For this reason, it should only be kept with other large, semi-aggressive fish. It will also eat smaller tank mates. Adult males should be kept one per aquarium, as they fight as fiercely as Bettas.

The male Blue Paradise has much longer fins than the female and is more brightly colored. To induce spawning, reduce the water level and increase the temperature. The male will build a bubblenest beneath a large leaf where the eggs will be stored. Breeding is relatively easy, and spawning can result in up to 500 fry. When the fry are hatched they should be fed infusoria, and when older, brine shrimp.

The Blue Paradise is an omnivore and requires both algae-based foods as well as meaty foods. An algae-based flake food, along with freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex, and brine shrimp will provide these fish with the proper nutrition.

Kissing Gourami

(Helostoma temmincki)
Kissing Gourami
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Moderate
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 6.8-8.5; KH 5-20
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 8"
Color Form: Iridescent, Peach, Pink
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised, Florida
Family: Helostomatidae

The Kissing Gourami is also known as the Kisser Fish or Pink Kisser. The Kissing Gourami is silvery-peach in color and has thick lips that can be extended or pursed (as in kissing). They are generally a tolerant species, but males may occasionally fight by pressing their lips together (i.e., kissing). The weaker of the two will normally back down. They are surface breathers and must have access to the surface of the aquarium.

The Kissing Gourami requires a 30-gallon or larger tank, with stones and plants. Plastic plants are best because they will eat most all vegetation in the aquarium, although Java Fern and possibly Java Moss may also be used. There is no need to clean the back of the aquarium because the Kissing Gourami will browse on the algae that is growing there. The Kissing Gourami is peaceful with other fish of similar size and will tolerate others of the same species.

There are no distinguishing characteristics between the male and female, although the female is usually heavier than the male. The Kissing Gourami prefers soft water for breeding and does not build a nest. Lettuce leaves should be laid on the surface for use as spawning material. The eggs will float to the lettuce where the fry will get nourishment from the bacteria and infusoria that is on the lettuce.

The Kissing Gourami is an omnivore and requires both algae-based foods as well as meaty foods. An algae-based flake food, along with freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex and brine shrimp will provide these fish with the proper nutrition.

Opaline Gourami

(Trichogaster trichopterus)
Opaline Gourami
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 20 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 6.0-8.0; KH 4-18
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 6"
Color Form: Iridescent, Turquoise
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Malaysia, South China Sea
Family: Belontiidae

The Opaline Gourami is also known as the Marbled Gourami, and is a color variation of the Blue Gourami. This gourami is a rather peaceful fish that is very comical to watch as a juvenile. The Opaline Gourami is silvery pale blue, with darker blue markings. Opaline Gouramis are considered Labyrinth Fish, meaning they breathe directly from the air and must have access to the surface of the tank.

The Opaline Gourami is compatible with a variety of tank mates that are of similar size and temperament. While males can be territorial with each other, they become timid around other, more aggressive fish. The ideal tank set-up would be a minimum of 20 gallons and have plenty of live plants as well as rocks and driftwood for use as hiding places.

The best way to differentiate between the male and female Opaline Gourami is by the dorsal fin. In the male, the dorsal fin is long and pointed, while the female's is shorter and rounded. When ready to breed, the male builds a bubblenest and begins to entice the female by swimming back and forth, flaring his fins and raising his tail. When this behavior is noticed, the water level should be reduced to 6 inches. After spawning, the female should be removed to a separate tank as the male may become aggressive toward her. The male will tend to the eggs until they hatch. After hatching, there should be frequent water changes, especially during the third week, as this is when the labyrinth organ is developing. The fry should be fed infusoria and nauplii.

The Opaline Gourami is an omnivore and prefers both algae-based foods as well as meaty foods. An algae-based flake food, along with freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex, and brine shrimp will provide these fish with the proper nutrition.

Powder Blue Dwarf Gourami

(Colisa lalia)
Powder Blue Dwarf Gourami
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallon
Care Level: Moderate
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 6.0-7.5; KH 4-10
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 2"
Color Form: Iridescent, Turquoise
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Bramaputra, Ganges, Jumna
Family: Belontiidae

The Powder Blue Dwarf Gourami, is a color variation of the Dwarf Gourami, and is an iridescent powder blue fish with red vertical stripes. This is a peaceful, shy fish that if in a pair will swim together. Powder Blue Dwarf Gouramis are considered Labyrinth Fish, meaning they breathe directly from the air, and must have access to the surface.

Powder Blue Dwarf Gouramis require a tank that is 10 gallons or larger. The aquarium should be heavily planted and have at least part of the surface covered with floating plants. A darker substrate will help show-off the gourami's colors, and peat filtration is recommended. Regular water changes are a must, as this gourami can be susceptible to disease. They should not be kept with large, aggressive fish, but are compatible with other small, peaceful fish as well as fellow gouramis. Loud noises often scare them, so the tank should be in a quiet area.

The Powder Blue Dwarf Gourami is a bubble nest builder that uses plants to help bind together the bubbles. Besides the difference in color, the sex can be determined by the dorsal fin. The male's dorsal fin is pointed the female's is rounded. The water level should be reduced to 8 inches during spawning, and the temperature should be approximately 82F. After spawning, the female should be moved to a different tank. The male will tend to the eggs and fry, and when the fry are 2-3 days old the male should also be removed. When first hatched, the fry should be fed infusoria, and later, brine shrimp and finely ground flakes. Freeze-dried tablets may also be fed to older fry.

The Powder Blue Dwarf Gourami is an omnivore and prefers both algae-based foods as well as meaty foods. An algae-based flake food, along with freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex, and brine shrimp will provide these fish with the proper nutrition.

Blue Gourami

(Trichogaster trichopterus)
Blue Gourami
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 20 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 6.0-8.8; KH 4-18
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 6"
Color Form: Turquoise
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Malaysia, South China Sea
Family: Belontiidae

The Blue Gourami is also known as the Three-Spot Gourami. This gourami is a rather peaceful fish that is very comical to watch as a juvenile. The Blue Gourami has only two spots, one in the center of the body, and a second at the beginning of the tail. The eye is actually the third "spot" that is referred to in the name. Traditionally silvery blue in color, their colors can change significantly with their moods, as well as during spawning, when they obtain a much deeper blue hue. Blue Gouramis are considered Labyrinth Fish, meaning they breathe directly from the air and should have access to the surface of the aquarium.

The Blue Gourami will be housed with a variety of tank mates that are of similar size and temperament. While males can be territorial with each other, they become timid around other, more aggressive fish. The ideal tank set-up would be an aquarium of a minimum of 20 gallons which has plenty of live plants as well as rocks and driftwood for use as hiding places.

The best way to differentiate between the male and female Blue Gourami is by the dorsal fin. In the male, the dorsal fin is long and pointed, while the female's is shorter and rounded. When ready to breed, the male builds a bubblenest and then begins to entice the female by swimming back and forth, flaring his fins and raising his tail. When this behavior is noticed, the water level should be reduced to 6 inches. After spawning the female should be removed to a separate aquarium as the male may become aggressive toward her. The male will tend to the eggs until they hatch, and after hatching, there should be frequent water changes, especially during the third week, as this is when the labyrinth organ is developing. The fry should be fed infusoria and nauplii.

The Blue Gourami is an omnivore and requires both algae-based foods as well as meaty foods. An algae-based flake food, along with freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex, and brine shrimp will provide these fish with the proper nutrition.

Gold Gourami

(Trichogaster trichopterus)
Gold Gourami
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 20 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 6.0-8.0; KH 4-18
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 6"
Color Form: Orange
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Malaysia, South China Sea
Family: Belontiidae

The Gold Gourami is a color variation of the Blue Gourami that is a deep orange with lighter orange shading. The Gold Gourami also has rust colored markings and is lacking the "spots" of the Blue Gourami. This gourami is a rather peaceful fish that is very comical to watch as a juvenile. Gold Gouramis are considered Labyrinth Fish, meaning they breathe directly from the air and should have access to the surface of the aquarium.

The Gold Gourami can be housed with a variety of tank mates that are of similar size and temperament. While males can be territorial with each other, they become timid around other, more aggressive fish. The ideal tank set-up would be an aquarium of a minimum of 20 gallons and have plenty of live plants as well as rocks and driftwood for use as hiding places.

The best way to differentiate between the male and female Gold Gourami is by the dorsal fin. In the male, the dorsal fin is long and pointed, while the female's is shorter and rounded. When ready to breed, the male builds a bubblenest and then begins to entice the female by swimming back and forth, flaring his fins and raising his tail. When this behavior is noticed, the water level should be reduced to 6 inches. After spawning the female should be removed to a separate aquarium as the male may become aggressive toward her. The male will tend to the eggs until they hatch, and after hatching, there should be frequent water changes, especially during the third week, as this is when the labyrinth organ is developing. The fry should be fed infusoria and nauplii.

The Gold Gourami is an omnivore and requires both algae-based foods as well as meaty foods. An algae-based flake food, along with freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex, and brine shrimp will provide these fish with the proper nutrition.

Chocolate Gourami

(Sphaerichthys osphromenoides)
Chocolate Gourami
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Difficult
Tank Conditions: 75-86F; pH 6.0-7.0; KH 2-4
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 2"
Color Form: Pale Brown, Yellow
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Borneo, Malacca, Malay Peninsula, Sumatra
Family: Belontiidae

The Chocolate Gourami is a peaceful fish that is greenish-brown with pearly-yellow stripes running vertically along its body. There is a dark, almost black 'spot' bordered in yellow at the base of the tail. This gourami makes a rewarding challenge for the advanced hobbyist, especially in breeding pairs.

The Chocolate Gourami is a delicate fish that should be housed in at least a 30 gallon tank. It can be prone to bacteria and skin parasites, so good water quality is essential. The Chocolate Gourami prefers a well-established, thickly planted tank, with peat extract. Frequent water changes are a must. They do best if kept in pairs and are compatible with other shy, peaceful fish as tank mates.

The best way to differentiate between the male and female is the yellow border that extends along the edge of the male's anal and caudal fins. The Chocolate Gourami is a mouth brooder that is a frugal spawner. The male and female will spawn on the bottom of the tank and the female collects the eggs in her mouth. She will hold the eggs for 14 days during which time she does not eat, therefore, it is important that the female be in top condition before breeding.

The Chocolate Gourami is an omnivore and prefers both algae-based foods as well as meaty foods. An algae-based flake food, along with freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex, and brine shrimp will provide these fish with the proper nutrition.

Licorice Gourami

(Parosphromenus deissneri)
Licorice Gourami
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 20 gallons
Care Level: Difficult
Tank Conditions: 74-82F; pH 5.6-7.2; KH 0-10
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 1"
Color Form: Black, Brown, Red, Turquoise
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Malaysia, Singapore
Family: Belontiidae

The Licorice Gourami is one of the smallest and most beautifully colored Labyrinth Fish. The male is much more brightly colored than the female, especially during courtship. The male has vertical stripes in black and silver with iridescent turquoise blue and red in the fins and tail. The female is brownish with black edging the fins. Because it can breathe though its gills it will rarely surface for air, unlike other Labyrinth Fish. The Licorice Gourami makes a great addition to the accomplished hobbyist's tank.

The Licorice Gourami requires a well planted tank of at least 20 gallons or larger. It needs soft, slightly acidic water with good filtration. It is a peaceful, gentle fish but does best in a species only tank. If this fish is housed in a community tank it should not be bred. The other fish in the community tank should be peaceful and shy.

The Licorice Gourami is a cave breeder. After spawning, the male will take care of the nest and chase away the female. The larvae will hatch after 72 hours in water temperatures of 77F, and will be free-swimming within 6 days. The fry will grow very slowly and should be fed infusoria and brine shrimp. They require very clean, pure water.

The Licorice Gourami is an omnivore and prefers both algae-based foods as well as meaty foods. An algae-based flake food, along with freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex, and brine shrimp will provide these fish with the proper nutrition.

Combtail Gourami

(Belontia signata)
Combtail Gourami
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Moderate
Tank Conditions: 74-82F; pH 6.0-8.0; KH 4-18
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 5"
Color Form: Orange, Pale, Yellow
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Sri Lanka
Family: Belontiidae

The Combtail Gourami is also known as the Comb-tailed Paradise Fish, the Ceylon Combtail or simply, Combtail. It is pale yellow-orange with a very faint reddish outline along the scales. A dark patch is at the base of the dorsal fin, next to the body. The Combtail Gourami is a Labyrinth Fish and must have access to the surface of the tank so it can breathe.

This gourami prefers a tank of at least 30 gallons that is densely planted and has large areas for swimming. It should be brightly lit and have many hiding places among plant roots. The Combtail Gourami should have larger tank mates, as it is often a boisterous fish. Some good choices would be the Kissing Gourami and Cichlids.

The male and female Combtail Gourami are hard to differentiate, with the male's dorsal fin being slightly more extended. The water level should be decreased and the temperature increased to induce spawning. When spawning, the eggs are normally lain in clumps under a plant leaf. Not a bubble nest builder, the male usually makes one large air bubble instead. The fry are free swimming after approximately 6 days and should be fed Artemia immediately. They may also be fed a very fine flake food.

The Combtail Gourami is an omnivore and prefers both algae based foods as well as meaty foods. An algae based flake food, along with freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex, and brine shrimp will provide these fish with the proper nutrition.

Giant Gourami

(Colisa fasciata)
Giant Gourami
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Moderate
Tank Conditions: 72-80F; pH 6.0-7.5; KH 4-10
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 4"
Color Form: Gold, Turquoise
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Assam, Bengal, Burma, India
Family: Belontiidae

The Giant Gourami, also known as Banded Gourami, Rainbow Gourami, or Striped Gourami, is a pale to golden yellow with silvery pale blue stripes running vertically along its body. In some parts of India it is used as a food fish, where it is dried and then eaten.

The Giant Gourami requires a tank that is 30 gallons or larger with densely planted edges, with preferably a dark tank bottom. There should be plenty of room left in the center of the tank for this gourami to swim. They prefer the company of other fish that are similar in size and temperament.

The Giant Gourami is an egg layer and the male will build a bubblenest before spawning. The male and female are distinguished by the dorsal fins and body color. The dorsal fin on the male ends in a point and the body is darker, changing to nearly black during spawning. When breeding, the water in the tank should be decreased to about 8 inches deep and the temperature should be 82F. After spawning, the female should be removed to a separate tank because the male will jealously guard the eggs, sometimes becoming aggressive towards the female. The eggs will hatch in 24 hours.

The Giant Gourami is omnivorous and prefers algae-based foods as well as meaty foods. An algae-based flake food, along with freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex, and brine shrimp will provide these fish with the proper nutrition.

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