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African Cichlids

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Pin Stripe Damba Cichlid
The Pin Stripe Damba or Menarambo comes from Lake Sarodrano in northern Madagascar.  It was discovered by Jean-Claude Nourissat and Patrick de Rham in 1992 and is now extinct in the wild.   When young, Mearambos are a pale gold  with black dots in a pin stripe pattern. As they reach adulthood, around 4 inches or 3 years of age, they are blue/gray to almost white with black dot pin stripes.  The fins are edged in red, especially the tail.  Memarambos will need a large tank of 140 gallons or more and should be kept in schools of 6 or more to reduce aggression.  The tank should provide fine sand, driftwood and stones.  Menarambos are indifferent to plants, but since they sift sand constantly, plants are not likely to survive.  Menarambos have teeth specially designed for crushing snail shells to obtain food.  They will also eat frozen brineshrimp, bloodworms and daphnia.

Males and females are extremely difficult to distinguish and to breed.  Cold water changes and natural light may enhance breeding.  When spawning, the pair will pale in color and darken on the underside with blue in the tail and face. They display with their head down and clean rocky areas.  Menarambos are a substrate spawner.  The eggs are laid in a pit and will adhere to surfaces such as driftwood.  The pair should be separated for spawning, as the eggs are quickly eaten by other fish in the tank despite attempts by the parents to protect them. Some sources indicate the parents themselves will eat the eggs.  Menarambos can be hybrid with Paretroplus maculates.

 Scientific Name:   Paretroplus menarambo
 Family:   Cichlid
 Temperature:   24 - 30 C; 75 - 86 F
 PH   7.0 - 8.0
 Size:    25 cm; 10 inches
 Life Span:    >6 years
 Breeding: 
  Difficult, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Juba Cichlid

The Juba cichlid comes from the northwest tip of island of Madagascar off the southeast coast of Africa.  They are also found on the island of Nosy Be. They exhibit lateral barring, a slight iridescence and darker coloring when mature.  Depending on their mood, they show immense variation in color, ranging from almost slate grey to black/purple. They develop blue lips when mature.  They can survive in brackish water.  Jubas should be kept in groups of at least 5 to reduce aggression.  The substrate should be fine sand and there should be rock caves for hiding.  They will not bother java fern.

Jubas are a substrate spawner, but will also lay eggs on glass and rocks.  Males develop more pronounced trailers on their dorsal fins. Jubas develop deep red highlights in their fins when spawning.  During spawning, over 200 eggs can be laid. The young can be fed artemia.

There is a variant known as the Tsipoy Cichlid or Ptychochromis oligacanthus nossibeensis.

 Scientific Name:   Ptychochromis oligacanthus
 Family:   Cichlid
 Temperature:   24 - 30 C; 75 - 86 F
 PH   7.0 - 8.0
 Size:    18 cm; 7 inches
 Life Span:    6 years
 Breeding: 
  Normal, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Paretroplus menarambo; possibly other medium sized cichlids
Cobalt Blue Zebra
The Cobalt Blue Zebra originated in deep rocky waters of Lake Malawi in Africa.  It is also known as the Cobalt Blue Mbuna and the Cobalt Zebra.  The scientific name is Metriaclima callainos, but see the discussion below about Metriaclima estherae.  The word “Mbuna” means “rock fish”, which refers to its habitat.  The Cobalt Blue Zebra has a light blue color applied consistently over the entire body with no faint zebra banding.  The species Metriclima estherae is very similar  and includes a blue version which can be differentiated by the occurrence of faint horizontal banding.  Other African zebra color variations include the Pearl Zebra, which is a pearl white color, the Red or Cherry Zebra, which is red/orange and the Orange Blotch or OB, which has black blotches on a pink/orange background.  There are eggs spots on the anal fin, which become important during breeding.  Females are a lighter gray/blue.

Clean water and proper pH are important in maintaining an mbuna tank.  Although some recommend using underground filters, external filters and bio-wheels  simultaneously to maintain quality, my experience is that underground filters are not suitable for mbunas.  They build nests (see picture) by picking up rocks in their mouth and moving them, so underground filters are quickly exposed in an mbuna tank.  Mbunas are very territorial, aggressive fish, even more so than Haplochromis Cichlids like the Electric Blue Ahli, so they should only be kept with other mbunas,  A grouping including more than 10 mbunas is recommended as this will spread out aggressive behavior.  The tank should be 75 – 100 gallons and should have rocks and hiding spaces to provide escape from aggression of other tankmates.  There should be smooth surfaced gravel for them to pick up in their mouths and move.  Mbunas enjoy plants, but will uproot them because they constantly rearrange the substrate.  Cobalt Blue Zebras will eat flake foods, spirulina flakes and cichlid pellets.  They should not be fed live worms or live brine shrimp, as these can bloat and kill the fish.

A male Zebra Cichlid should be kept with several females.  The Zebra is a mouth brooder and the spawning process is intriguing.  The male will establish a territory and its colors will become enhanced when it is ready to breed.  A female that is ready to spawn will then enter the territory and the two will interact aggressively.  The female then releases a couple of eggs into a gravel pit.  She then picks these up in her mouth.  Meanwhile the male displays the “egg spots” on his anal fin.  These spots are the same size and color as the real eggs.  The female nips at these eggs spots and the male releases his sperm, which then reaches the females mouth and fertilizes the real eggs that she has previously picked up.  The process is then repeated until the female has a brood of between 10 and 50 eggs in her mouth.  After spawning, the female keeps the eggs in her mouth for about a week until they hatch.  After that, the fry will seek safety by retreating into the female’s mouth for up to a month.  During this period, the female rarely eats.  Once the fry are able to fend for themselves, the female stops allowing them in her mouth.  The entire process is quite stressful for the female, so a separate tank for her during this period is recommended.

 Scientific Name:   Metriaclima callainos
 Family:   Cichlid
 Temperature:   22 - 28 C; 72 - 83 F
 PH   7.5 - 8.5
 Size:    10 cm; 4 inches
 Life Span:    10 years
 Breeding: 
  Normal, Egg Layer

Compatibility:

Mbunas Auratus, Johanni, Kenyi, Lemon Yellow, Orange Blotch, Pindani, Red Zebra and Synodontis Catfish only.  Too aggressive for Haplochromis and Peacock Cichlids.
Red/Cherry Zebra
Orange Blotch Zebra
Ice Blue Zebra
 

Red Zebra Cichlid

(Pseudotropheus zebra)
Red Zebra Cichlid
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 50 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 7.8-8.5; KH 10-18
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 5"
Color Form: Red, Yellow
Temperament: Aggressive
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised, USA
Family: Cichlidae

The Red Zebra African Cichlid, Pseudotropheus zebra, is known by a plethora of other names, often based on color. The Red Zebra, although appearing more of a yellow color, is often a brilliant red in the wild. It does not have notable stripes like other varieties of this genus and species. Pseudotropheus zebra is a Mbuna Cichlid, and is also called the Zebra Cichlid, Tilapia Zebra, and the False Zebra Mbuna.

A bully by nature, without plenty of room, pyramids, rocks and crevasses to establish territory, Red Zebra will torment other tank mates.

Most members of the mouth brooding variety of African Cichlids are easily bred while in the aquarium if given the proper tank set-up and excellent water conditions. Matriarchal in family structure, the female first lays up to 60 eggs, which she then scoops into her mouth where they are fertilized. The fry remain in the female's mouth for 12 to 18 days before being released. A small group of 5 to 7 females and one male provide the best opportunity for breeding.

Omnivorous, the Red Zebra will enjoy all manner of flaked foods, live foods, algae, lettuce, spinach, and duckweed in its diet.

 
The Zebra Cichlid originated in deep rocky waters of Lake Malawi in Africa.  It is also known as the Red Mbuna, the Cherry Zebra, the Pearl Zebra, the Cobalt Blue Zebra, the Red or Orange Blotch Zebra and the OB.  The word “Mbuna” means “rock fish”, which refers to its habitat.  It is sometimes referred to by the scientific name Pseudotropheus Zebra, but subsequently has transitioned through the name Maylandia to end up being called Metriclima.  The authority on Metriaclima estherae is Ad Konings and the name estherae refers his friend Stuart Grant's wife, Esther.  The zebra originally had stripes similar to the unrelated Convict Cichlid and the dark banding is faintly apparent on some specimens .  There is much confusion surrounding the Cobalt Blue Zebra.  In the pictures above we show a variation which has faint vertical banding, while a solid blue specimen is more likely to be Metriaclima callainos.

There are eggs spots on the anal fin, which become important during breeding.  Information on the sexing of Metriaclima estherae shows a variety of opinon.  Most frequently, references indicate that the males are blue, while the females are orange or orange blotch.  Some sources indicate the color variation is apparent already in the fry.  A large number of egg spots is considered an indication of a male.  There is an abundance of confusion on the topic though, so feel free to email in your opinions. 

Clean water and proper pH are important in maintaining an mbuna tank.  Although some recommend using underground filters, external filters and bio-wheels  simultaneously to maintain quality, my experience is that underground filters are not suitable for mbunas.  They build nests (see picture) by picking up rocks in their mouth and moving them, so underground filters are quickly exposed in an mbuna tank.  Mbunas are very territorial, aggressive fish, even more so than Haplochromis Cichlids like the Electric Blue Ahli, so they should only be kept with other mbunas,  A grouping including more than 10 mbunas is recommended as this will spread out aggressive behavior.  The tank should be 75 – 100 gallons and should have rocks and hiding spaces to provide escape from aggression of other tankmates.  Some gravel should be present, as mbunas keep very busy rearranging it.  They enjoy plants, but will destroy them.  I've had some success keeping Brazilian Ivy floating in their tanks.  Plastic plants floating at the surface can provide areas of safety for females and smaller males.  Zebras will eat flake foods, spirulina flakes and cichlid pellets.  They also enjoy romaine or other lettuce products.  They should not be fed live worms, as these can bloat and kill the fish.

Zebra cichlids are extremely aggressive to their own and other species.  The dominant male will continually keep harassing and  killing off the weakest members of the tank.  For this reason, a male Zebra Cichlid should be kept with several females in a very large tank.  The Zebra is a mouth brooder and the spawning process is intriguing.  The male will establish a territory and its colors will become enhanced when it is ready to breed.  A female that is ready to spawn will then enter the territory and the two will interact aggressively.  They may even lock jaws.  The female then releases a couple of eggs into a gravel pit.  She picks these up in her mouth.  Meanwhile the male displays the “egg spots” on his anal fin.  These spots are the same size and color as the real eggs.  The female nips at these eggs spots and the male releases his sperm, which then reaches the females mouth and fertilizes the real eggs that she has previously picked up.  The process is then repeated until the female has a brood of between 10 and 50 eggs in her mouth.  Although you may not see the spawning activity, the swollen cheeks of the female, her disinterest in food and her desire for isolation are all indications that she has bred.  It's a good idea to remove her to a separate tank at this point.  The female keeps the eggs in her mouth for more than a week until they hatch. She will not eat during this time.  After hatching, the female may occasionally scoop them into her mouth for protection, but generally the fry hide from their parent.  The female will eventually show a healthy interest in feeding again and can be returned to the main tank, however care must be taken to watch the dynamics with other zebras.  A female who has previously been living for years in a tank with other Zebras can be killed by them in a matter of hours after returning to the tank.  The other Zebras have no recall of her former status in the tank and will attack her as a newcomer.  The female can stay in the breeding tank with the young.  At two months the fry will compete with their mother for food.  She will drive them off with actions that appear as if she is eating them, but this is simply a warning that she has priority over them for food at this stage.

Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Perciformes (perch-like fish)
Family: Cichlidae
Scientific Name: Pseudotropheus zebra
Other Scientific Name(s): Metriaclima zebra, Tilapia zebra
Common Name: Zebra Cichlid
Other Common Names: Zebra mbuna
Distribution: Southeast Africa: Endemic to Lake Malawi. Occurs on the northwestern coast between Cape Manulo and Kande Is. Also found on Jalo Reef, at Namalenje Is., Cape Maclear, Monkey Bay, Boadzulu Is. and Nkopola. On the eastern part, occurs at Fort Maguire, Masinj

Diet: Omnivores: a varied diet containing blood worms, pellets and zucchini is best.
Temperament: Extremely territorial and very aggressive.

Breeding: Mouthbrooders: The female will hold the eggs in her oral cavity until they hatch. The fry will continue to return to the mothers mouth for shelter until they are rejected by her. The parents are known to herd their fry around the tank and protect them from all dangers. <60 eggs estimated.

Other Comments: Zebras come in an assortment of colors and are an attractive addition to aquariums. They are a good beginner fish as they are hardy but must be cautioned for their temperament. They will prove to be one of the most intelligent of the fresh water species.

Min. Tank Size: 30 gallons
Temperature: 72-82 F
pH: 7.5-9.0
Max Size: 5.5 inches

 Scientific Name:   Metriaclima estherae
 Family:   Cichlid
 Temperature:   22 - 28; 72 - 83 F
 PH   7.5 - 8.5
 Size:    10 cm; 4 inches
 Life Span:    10 years
 Breeding: 
  Normal , Egg Layer,
  Mouth Brooder

Compatibility:

Mbuna Cichlids such as the Auratus, Cobalt Blue, Johanni, Lemon Yellow, Pindani, Tropheops, and Kenyi.  Also synodontis catfish.  Too aggressive for Haplochromis and Peacock Cichlids.
Blue Johanni
Blue Johanni are African Cichlids originating in Lake Malawi.  They are classified as Melanochromis Johannii, but are also known by the scientific name Melanochromis cyaneorhabdos Maingano.  The johanni males have light blue one a black background, while the maingano males are light blue against a darker blue background.  There is a checked pattern of light and dark on the johanni male, while maingano males have a more stripped appearance.  The striping effect is much more pronounced than the Blue Ahli and it is an mbuna, which is a smaller, more aggressive cichlid.  The females and juveniles are a bright yellow/orange.  They will eat flake foods, algae based flake foods and cichlid pellets.  Do not feed live worms or live brine shrimp, as these can bloat and kill the fish.

Although one of the less aggressive mbunas, Blue Johanni are very territorial, aggressive fish, even more so than Haplochromis Cichlids like the Blue Ahli.  They need large swimming spaces, so a 75 gallon tank is recommended.  Although some recommend using underground filters, external filters and bio-wheels  simultaneously to maintain quality, my experience is that underground filters are not suitable for mbunas.  They build nests (see picture) by picking up rocks in their mouth and moving them, so underground filters are quickly exposed in an mbuna tank. Rocks and other hiding areas should be provided and there should be little or no gravel.  They enjoy plants, but will destroy them.  A grouping including more than 10 mbunas is recommended, as it tends to reduce aggressive tendencies in a larger grouping.

It is preferable to have several females for each male.  The male will attract the female for breeding.  Up to 50 eggs are fertilized externally before the female picks them up to brood in her mouth for a period of approximately two weeks.  This protection makes it easy to breed them in a community tank.  Move the female to a separate tank just before she releases the brood.

 Scientific Name:   Melanochromis johannii
 Family:   Cichlid
 Temperature:   22 - 28 C; 72 - 83 F
 PH   7.5 - 8.5
 Size:    10 cm; 4 inches
 Life Span:    10 years
 Breeding: 
  Normal , Egg Layer,
  Mouth Brooder

Compatibility:

Mbuna Cichlids such as the Auratus, Cobalt Blue, Lemon Yellow, Pindani, Tropheops, Red Zebra and Kenyi.  Also synodontis catfish.  Too aggressive for Haplochromis and Peacock Cichlids.
Electric Yellow Lab
The Electric Yellow Lab originates from rocky areas of Lake Malawi in Africa.  It is an “mbuna” or rockfish.  It is also called a Lab, Yellow Lab, Electric Yellow Labido, Electric Yellow Labidochromis, Yellow Labidochromis, Lemon Yellow and a Blue Streak Hap.  The scientific name “caeruleus” means blue and refers to the fact that the black streak along the top of the dorsal fin turns blue on males during breeding.  Most Labidochromis caeruleus are yellow, however some specimens are white or light blue.  The dorsal fins are black and there is black coloring in the dorsal and ventral fins.  Electric Yellows are not as aggressive as other African Cichlids, which makes them a good starter cichlid.  Males will fight though, so a grouping with more females than males is recommended.  They will sometimes school in tight groups.  They will do well in an mbuna tank with lots of rocks, caves and hiding places.  They are not as aggressive as Auratus and Johannis, though.  They need very clear water, so extra filtration is recommended.  Although some recommend using underground filters, external filters and bio-wheels  simultaneously to maintain quality, my experience is that underground filters are not suitable for mbunas.  They built nests (see picture) by picking up rocks in their mouth and moving them, so underground filters are quickly exposed in an mbuna tank.  These fish are fast swimmers and are a challenge to catch in a net.  Algae and spirulina flakes are an important staple for mbunas, but less so for the Electric Yellow.  They will also eat flake foods, cichlid pellets, freeze-dried bloodworms and small fish. They should not be fed live worms or live brine shrimp, as these can bloat and kill the fish, although the Electric Yellow is less susceptible to this than other mbunas.

Electric Yellows are not difficult to breed.  Water should be changed and the level dropped.  Males are larger, brighter colored and have more black on the fins.  Males exhibit more aggressive behavior when ready to breed.  They do not show egg spots, unlike most mbunas.  It is best to breed one male with several females.  Electric Yellows are mouth brooders.  The female cares for 10 – 25 eggs in her mouth.  She also keeps the fry in her mouth for up to 3 weeks.  The female should be isolated after breeding.  The fry can be fed brine shrimp.

 Scientific Name:   Labidochromis caeruleus
 Family:   Cichlid
 Temperature:   22 - 28 C; 72 - 83 F
 PH   7.5 - 8.5
 Size:    10 cm; 4 inches
 Life Span:    10 years
 Breeding: 
  Normal , Egg Layer,
  Mouth Brooder
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 50 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 7.8-8.5; KH 10-15
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 5"
Color Form: Yellow
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised, Thailand
Family: Cichlidae

The Electric Yellow African Cichlid is also known as the Yellow Lab or Electric Yellow Lab and gets its rather unusual name as a result of its brilliant yellow coloration, setting it apart from other cichlids. Considered a new species and referred to commercially as Labidochromis tanganicae, this cichlid lives in the waters of Lake Malawi between the islands of Charo and Mbowe. First displayed at Burundi in the early 1980's and exported from there, the Electric Yellow was mistakenly believed to come from Lake Tanganyika. Small Electric Yellows will often not show the vivid black striping on the fins until they mature and age.

A peaceful and shy cichlid when compared to the temperament of other African Cichlids, Electric Yellow would be considered semi-aggressive in a standard fresh water aquarium. The aquarium should include a sandy bottom, robust plants, caves, and rocks.

The female lays her eggs on the surface of rocks and then scoops them into her mouth where they brood for 18 days before being released.

The Electric Yellow Lab needs both meaty foods and greens such as brine shrimp, blood worms, and quality flake or pellet food containing vegetable matter.

Compatibility:

Mbuna Cichlids such as the AuratusCobalt Blue, Johanni, Pindani, Red Zebra, Tropheops, and Kenyi.  Also synodontis catfish.  Too aggressive for Haplochromis and Peacock Cichlids.
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Perciformes (perch-like fish)
Family: Cichlidae
Scientific Name: Labidochromis caeruleus
Other Scientific Name(s): Labidochromis caeruleum
Common Name: Electric Yellow
Other Common Names: Blue streak hap
Distribution: West Africa: from the Niger Delta in Nigeria, Cross and Kribi River in Cameroon.
Diet: Omnivores: a varied diet containing blood worms, pellets and zucchini is best.
Temperament: Territorial and aggressive and can be added to a specialized community tank.
Breeding: Mouthbrooders: The female will hold the eggs in her oral cavity until they hatch. The fry will continue to return to the mothers mouth for shelter until they are rejected by her. The parents are known to herd their fry around the tank and protect them from all dangers.
Other Comments: Electric Yellows are an attractive addition to aquariums. They are a good beginner fish as they are hardy but must be cautioned for their temperament. They will prove to be one of the most intelligent of the fresh water species. bulky big fish then they need to fed on pelleted food through summer, and left through winter. They are so messy it necessary to have a good working filter that can cope with the bio load.
Min. Tank Size: 30 gallons
Temperature: 73-79 F
pH: 7.0-8.0
Max Size: 3.5 inches
Auratus
The Auratus originates from the rocky depths of Lake Malawi.  The term auratus means yellow or golden, which is also part of the scientific name for Goldfish (unrelated).   The Auratus is an mbuna or rockfish and is also known as the Golden Mbuna and the Malawi Golden Cichlid.  The scientific name was previously Pseudotropheus auratus.  The females have the brighter coloration, which is a rarity in the fish world.  Females are yellow with three dark parallel stripes fringed in white.  Males are black or brown and have a yellow/white stripe running through the mid line of their body.  When they are young, the males look like females, which helps them survive the aggression of adult males.  This fish can apparently change its sex when conditions dictate an imbalance in breeding partners.  Auratus are very aggressive.  Not only will a male attack and kill other males, but females are known to kill each other as well. One male and 3 – 5 females are recommended for a tank.

Auratus should be part of a large tank of 75 gallons or more that has caves, hiding areas and other species of mbuna.  Live plants will be destroyed.  A gravel substrate should be provided, but sharp material should be avoided, as mbunas will filter substrate through their mouths.  Frequent water changes and multiple types of filtration are suggested.  Although some recommend using underground filters, external filters and bio-wheels simultaneously to maintain quality, my experience is that underground filters are not suitable for mbunas.  They build nests (see picture) by picking up rocks in their mouth and moving them, so underground filters are quickly exposed in an mbuna tank.  The Auratus lives mainly on algae, so a quality spirulina flake food should be provided. Vegetable matter, plants, pellets and freeze dried foods can also be provided.  It is best to avoid live foods as these can induce bloating in mbunas, which can be fatal. 

Auratus are mouth brooders.  They tend to be more aggressive at the higher end of their temperature range and this can induce breeding.  Increased aggression and digging in the substrate are both indications of impending spawning.  Upon fertilization, the female takes the eggs in her mouth for hatching.  Auratus are excellent parents and can raise their young in the same tank with other mbunas.  The young can take sanctuary in the female’s mouth for up to a month after hatching.  The female will rarely eat while she is raising young.

Although danios, barbs and rainbowfish are sometimes suggested as dither fish to draw cichlids from hiding or target fish for reducing aggression among cichlids, we don’t recommend that these species be subjected to the aggression of cichlids.

 Scientific Name:   Melanochromis auratus 
 Family:   Cichlid
 Temperature:   22 - 28 C; 72 - 83 F
 pH   7.5 - 8.5
 Size:    12 cm; 5 inches
 Life Span:    10 years
 Breeding: 
  Normal , Egg Layer,
  Mouth Brooder

Compatibility:

Mbuna Cichlids such as the Cobalt Blue, Electric Yellow Lab, Johanni, Lemon Yellow, Pindani, Red Zebra, Tropheops, and Kenyi.  Also synodontis catfish.  Too aggressive for Haplochromis and Peacock Cichlids.
New Yellow Regal Peacock Cichlid
Yellow Peacock Cichlid
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 50 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 7.8-8.5; KH 10-15
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 6"
Color Form: Bright Yellow, Yellow
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised, USA
Family: Cichlidae

The Yellow Peacock Cichlid comes from years of breeding and is not a naturally occurring strain. It is yellow in coloration and has the same form as the other Peacock Cichlids of the same family. The male displays the typical egg spots on the anal fin and is typically more colorful than the female, especially during breeding.

The Yellow Peacock Cichlid does well in an aquarium that is at least 50 gallons with plenty of rocks for territories and a sandy bottom. The males are usually only aggressive towards their own species unless their territory is invaded upon. Provide a ratio of 3 to 4 females to one male.

Again, provide multiple females for the male, as it will take the stress off of the female carrying the eggs. Incubation is approximately three weeks, at which time the female will release the fry. Provide the fry with newly hatched brine shrimp and finely ground flake food.

The Yellow Peacock Cichlid should be fed a variety of both meaty and vegetable-based foods. Feed live and frozen brine shrimp along with Spirulina-based flake and pellet foods.

Demason's
Demasoni Cichlid
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 50 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 8.0-9.0; KH 9-19
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 3"
Color Form: Black, Blue, Deep Blue, White
Temperament: Aggressive
Diet:  Herbivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Africa - Lake Malawi
Family: Cichlidae

The Demasoni Cichlid, Pseudotropheus demasoni, is a relatively rare cichlid, which originates from a specific rocky point called Pombo Rocks, within the waters of Lake Malawi located in Tanzania, Africa. The male of this species has dark blue or black vertical stripes with alternating lighter stripes of light blue to white. The male Demasoni Cichlid also displays the typical spots on the anal fin, and is considerably larger than the female. The female of this species is not as brilliantly colored, and lacks the spots on the anal fin.

A large aquarium with plenty of caves and hiding places is ideal for these fish. An aragonite-based substrate is recommended in order to maintain the necessary high pH and alkalinity.

For best results in spawning, the males should be kept with at least three females. The female will spawn on a flat rock, and will take the unfertilized eggs into her mouth and will follow closely behind the male until he releases the sperm to fertilize the eggs. The female will then incubate the eggs for approximately three weeks before releasing the fry. The fry can then be fed newly hatched brine shrimp, daphnia, or crushed flake food.

The Demasoni Cichlid needs to be fed vegetable rich foods in the form of flake food, dried seaweed and algae. Brine shrimp, small fish and other meaty foods should only be fed periodically, as their main diet should consist of vegetable matter.

Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Perciformes (perch-like fish)
Family: Cichlidae
Scientific Name: Pseudotropheus demasoni
Common Name: Demasoni
Distribution: Africa: Pombo Rocks, Lake Malawi [Lake Nyasa], Tanzania.
Diet: This species requires the same diet as any other Lake Malawi Mbuna. Spirulina tablets, blanched spinach or zukini, or even cichlid pellets. Be careful with the cichlid pellets tho. I found mine were prone to Malawi bloat if I fed them pellets more than once or twice a week. I ended up turning them into a treat.
Temperament: Peacefull and easy-going. Good tank-mate for L. caeruleus.

Breeding: Fairle easy. Watch for a storm brewing. IE barometric pressure either going up or down. Do a 50-75% water change and raice the tank temp to about 80/81 degrees and let mother nature take her course. (Frank Sinatra music helps)

Min. Tank Size: 50 gallons
Temperature: 77-82 F
pH: 7.9-8.5
Max Size: 3 inches

Spothead Hap
Ruby Red Peacock
 
Red Peacock Cichlid
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 50 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 7.8-8.5; KH 10-15
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 6"
Color Form: Red
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised, USA
Family: Chilidae

The Red Peacock Cichlid comes from years of breeding and is not a naturally occurring strain. It is red in coloration and has the same form as the other Peacock Cichlids of the same family. The male displays the typical egg spots on the anal fin and is typically more colorful than the female, especially during breeding.

The Red Peacock Cichlid does well in an aquarium that is at least 50 gallons with plenty of rocks for territories and a sandy bottom. The males are usually only aggressive towards their own species unless their territory is invaded upon. Provide a ratio of 3 to 4 females to one male.

Again, provide multiple females for the male, as it will take the stress off of the female carrying the eggs. Incubation is approximately three weeks, at which time the female will release the fry. Provide the fry with newly hatched brine shrimp and finely ground flake food.

The Red Peacock Cichlid should be fed a variety of both meaty and vegetable-based foods. Feed live and frozen brine shrimp along with Spirulina-based flake and pellet foods.

Blue Ahli
Blue Ahli are African Cichlids originating in Lake Malawi.  They are also know as the Blue Hap, as they are Haplochromis Cichlids.  The males turn the electric blue color.  Females and juveniles are completely gray.  Blue Ahli will eat flake foods, algae based flake foods and cichlid pellets.  Do not feed them live worms, beefheart or live brine shrimp, as these can bloat and kill the fish.

Blue Ahli are very territorial, aggressive fish.  They need large swimming spaces, so a 90 gallon tank is recommended.  Rocks and other hiding areas can be provided, however they traditionally stay away from the rocks due to fear of mbunas, like the Cobalt Blue Zebra, the  Red Zebra or the Blue Johanni.  Neverthess, Blue Ahlis can hold their own against mbunas.  There should be little or no gravel in the tank.  They enjoy plants, but will destroy them.  A grouping including more than 10 haplochromis and peacock cichlids is recommended.  Male Blue Ahli should not be combined, unless they have adequate hiding areas from each other.  A single male with two or three females works quite well.  

Eggs are fertilized externally before the female picks them up to brood in her mouth for a period of approximately two weeks.  This protection makes it easy to breed them in a community tank.  Move the female to a separate tank just before she releases the brood.

Diet: Eats flake food for cichlids witch contains lots of proteins and vegetables. Also feeds on live food and frozen live food. Be carefull not give red meat like beef heart, the fat isn\'t god for him. He just love the mix of schrimps, clams and spinach.
Temperament: In nature, sc. Fyeri feeds on small fishes, mostly young m'bunas. But in tank, he his fairly calm and has a good interspecific behavior with other calm species like haplos, aulonocara and calm m'bunas. Doesn't attack other fishes in the tank.

Breeding: Sc. Fryeri his a mouthbrouder, and lay eggs on a flat rock or substrate in a shape of T.

Other Comments: So little information about this absolutely beautifull fish! Sc. Fryeri is often mistaken for sciaenochormmis ahli witch color is less bright. Needs frequent water change, does not support high NO3, but likes salt and a PH around 8.5.

Min. Tank Size: 30 gallons
Temperature: 80 F
pH: 8.5
Max Size: 8 inches inches

 Scientific Name:   Sciaenochromis ahli
 Family:   Cichlid
 Temperature:   24 - 26 C; 75 - 79 F
 pH   8
 Size:    20 cm; 8 inches
 Life Span:    10 years
 Breeding: 
  Normal , Egg Layer,
  Mouth Brooder

Compatibility:

Haplochromis Cichlids such as the Blue Dolphin Hap, Malawi Eye Biter, Red Finned Borleyi.  Also Peacock Cichlids and synodontis catfish.  The Blue Ahli is very aggressive and can hold its own with Mbunas.
Pindani
Giraffe Hap

Moorei Cichlid

(Cyrtocara moorii)
  Click here for a larger image
Moorei Cichlid
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 70 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 7.8-8.5; KH 10-15
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 9"
Color Form: Blue
Temperament: Aggressive
Diet:  Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Africa - Lake Malawi
Family: Cichlidae

The Moorei Cichlid, also called the Haplochromis moorii, or Dolphin Cichlid is a fairly typical member of the Cichlidae family. These powder blue fish make great candidates for the African Cichlid aquarium. The males of the species will develop a large protruding hump on the forehead as the fish matures.

The Moorei Cichlid does well with other Lake Malawi cichlids when provided with a spacious, rocky tank of 70 gallons or more. Although plants may be beneficial for other tank members they are extraneous for the Morrei Cichlid, and fish larger than three inches will often uproot them. The Moorei African Cichlid can be aggressive toward smaller fish.

Considered a specialized mouth brooder, eggs are fertilized and carried by the female. Within 12 to 18 days, fry are released, measuring 1/4 inch. Once released, they do not return to their mother again. Most members of the mouth brooding variety of African Cichlids are easily bred while in the aquarium when given the proper tank set-up and excellent water conditions. A small group of 5 to 7 females and one male will provide the best opportunities for breeding. The best way to achieve this is to purchase a group of 8 or more individuals of a small size.

The Moorei African Cichlid is a carnivore and prefers a diet rich in meaty foods. Cichlid pellets, ocean plankton, and freeze-dried foods such as bloodworms, tubifex, and brine shrimp will provide this species with the proper nutrition.

Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Perciformes (perch-like fish)
Family: Cichlidae
Scientific Name: Cyrtocara moorii
Other Scientific Name(s): Haplochromis moorii, Cyrtocara moorei, Haplochromis moori, Cyrtocara moori
Common Name: Blue Dolphin Cichlid
Other Common Names: Hump-head
Distribution: Asia, Oceania, and Western Pacific, from the Ryukyu Islands to New Caledonia.
Diet: Theeir diet should consist of oth meat and vegetable matter. You should probrobly feed them mainly flake food or soaked pellets. Once a week you could feed live or frozen brine shrimp or some chopped beefheart. DO NOT OVER FEED !!! may get bloated.

Breeding: Usually starts to breed after about two years of age. It could be done in a 50 gallon but you should breed in a bigger tank. They are mouth brooders so she takes the eggs straight into her mouth after she lays them. She usually lays about 50-100 eggs and with her first brood she would probrobly swallow the young. Once I stripped my female she spit the fry out all over the gravel and I had to get the fry from there. Usually before you even get the mother out the tank she would spit the fry out into the net.

Other Comments: This has been one of my favorite fish to raise if your a starter with african cichlids and planning to get bigger aquariums I would really recomend these fish !!!

Min. Tank Size: 75 gallons
Temperature: 78-82 F
pH: 8.0
Max Size: 6-14 inches

Acei Cichlid

(Psuedotropheus sp. "Acei")
Acei Cichlid
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 70 gallons
Care Level: Moderate
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 8.0-9.0; KH 9-19
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 7"
Color Form: Blue, Bright Yellow
Temperament: Aggressive
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised
Family: Cichlidae

The Psuedotropheus Acei originates from the Northwestern coast of Lake Malawi from Bandawe Point to Ngara in Zambia, Africa. They have long slender blue body with striking yellow fins. There is little to differentiate males from females, other than the males bear egg spots on the back edge of the anal fin.

A large aquarium with plenty of caves and hiding places is ideal for the Psuedotropheus Acei. Caves can be formed from limestone or any other type of inert rock, as well as African Driftwood. An aragonite-based substrate is recommended in order to maintain the necessary high pH and alkalinity. These Cichlids do not like bright lighting, and the aragonite should ideally be either mixed with or covered by darker gravel to reduce the amount of glare in the aquarium.

For best results in spawning, the males should be kept with at least three females. The female will spawn on a flat rock, and will take the unfertilized eggs into her mouth and will follow closely behind the male until he releases the sperm to fertilize the eggs. The female will then incubate the eggs for approximately three weeks before releasing the fry. The fry can then be fed newly hatched brine shrimp, daphnia, or crushed flake food.

The Psuedotropheus Acei feeds upon the sediment covered rocks and wood in nature, and is an omnivore. Provide a balanced diet of meaty flake, pellet and frozen foods, as well as dried seaweed and other plant based flake and pellet foods.

Kenyi Cichlid

(Pseudotropheus lombardoi)
Kenyi Cichlid
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 50 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 7.8-8.5; KH 10-20
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 5"
Color Form: Blue, Yellow
Temperament: Aggressive
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Africa - Lake Malawi
Family: Cichlidae

The Kenyi Cichlid, Pseudotropheus lombardoi, is an aggressive medium sized cichlid that originates from the rocky shores of Lake Malawi in Africa. The female is blue with black bars and the male turns to a yellow color as it matures.

The Kenyi Cichlid is ideally kept in a 50 gallon or larger aquarium decorated with plenty of rocks and caves in order to provide adequate hiding places for these territorial fish.

The male is sexually mature when the full yellow color is achieved, and reproduction in this species is considered easy compared to other cichlids. They are a mouth brooding species and the fry are released from the female's mouth in about 3 weeks after fertilization. Feed the fry baby brine shrimp and finely ground flake food.

The Kenyi should be given a diet containing mostly vegetable-based foods, supplemented with meaty type foods. Feed with a quality vegetable-based flake food, algae, and other foods designed for African Cichlids.

Yellowfin Borleyi Cichlid

(Copadichromis borleyi)
Yellowfin Borleyi Cichlid
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 70 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 8.0-9.0; KH 9-19
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 7"
Color Form: Blue, Bright Yellow
Temperament: Aggressive
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised
Family: Cichlidae

The Yellowfin Borleyi Cichlid, also known as Haplochromis barlowi, originates from the Southern part of Lake Malawi, Africa. The males have a blue body with striking yellow fins, and are one of the larger Copadichromis Cichlids reaching a maximum size of 7". When mature, the females remain brown to silver in color, and will be slightly smaller than the males.

A large aquarium with plenty of caves and hiding places is ideal for the Yellowfin Borleyi Cichlid. Caves can be formed from limestone or any other type of inert rock, as well as African Driftwood. An aragonite-based substrate is recommended in order to maintain the necessary high pH and alkalinity. They do not like bright lighting, and the aragonite should ideally be either mixed with or covered by darker gravel to reduce the amount of glare in the aquarium. The Yellowfin Borleyi Cichlid requires a substrate deep enough to burrow in during breeding time.

For best results in spawning, the males should be kept with at least three females. The female will spawn on a flat rock, and will take the unfertilized eggs into her mouth and follow closely behind the male until he releases the sperm to fertilize the eggs. The female will then incubate the eggs for approximately three weeks before releasing the fry. The fry can then be fed newly hatched brine shrimp, daphnia, or crushed flake food.

The Yellowfin Borleyi Cichlid feeds upon the sediment covered rocks and wood in nature, and is an omnivore. Provide a balanced diet of meaty flake, pellet and frozen foods, as well as dried seaweed and other plant based flake and pellet foods.

Fuelleborni Cichlid, Orange Blossom

(Labeotropheus fuelleborni)
  Click here for a larger image
Fuelleborni Cichlid, Orange Blossom
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 50 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 7.8-8.5; KH 10-18
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 5"
Color Form: Black, Blue, Orange
Temperament: Aggressive
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised
Family: Cichlidae

The Fuelleborni Cichlid, OB originates from the waters of Lake Malawi, Africa. There are many color variations of the Fuelleborni Cichlid, and this variation is referred to as "OB" or "Orange Blossom". These fish vary tremendously in coloration, but will have a mix of blue, black and orange. The males bear the typical egg spots and are typically larger than the females at maturity.

Provide the Fuelleborni Cichlid with an aquarium of at least 50 gallons with a sandy substrate and plenty of stacked rocks. They are aggressive by nature and are very territorial, so provide ample caves within the rockwork to reduce this aggression.

Most members of the mouth brooding variety of African Cichlids are easily bred while in the aquarium if given the proper tank set-up and excellent water conditions. Matriarchal in family structure, the female first lays up to 60 eggs, which she then scoops into her mouth where they are fertilized. The fry remain in the female's mouth for 12 to 21 days before being released. For the following week or so, the female will scoop the young back into her mouth when any danger is sensed. A small group of 5 to 7 females and one male provide the best opportunity for breeding.

Although the Fuelleborni Cichlid is Omnivorous, the majority of their diet should be plant based. They will enjoy all manner of flaked foods, spinach, dried seaweed and lettuce tied to a rock or fed with a lettuce clip. Also supplement their diet with either dried or frozen bloodworms, brine and mysis shrimp.

Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Perciformes (perch-like fish)
Family: Cichlidae
Scientific Name: Labeotropheus fuelleborni
Other Scientific Name(s): Labeotropheus curvirostris, Labeotropheus fulleborni
Common Name: Fuelleborn's Cichlid
Other Common Names: Blue mbuna
Distribution: West Africa: from the Niger Delta in Nigeria, Cross and Kribi River in Cameroon.
Diet: Fresh spinach, peas, lettuce and zucchini. Live fish, blood worms, brine shrimp, glass worms, tubifex worms, crickets and mealworms. Frozen blood worms, beef heart, plankton, hi-pro diet, vegetable diet, glass worms and brine shrimp. Freeze dried and tablet foods also accepted
Temperament: A very territorial and aggressive species. Provide lots of territories for the cichlids. Synodontis Catfish make a great addition as a bottom feeder

Breeding: The males have the egg spots on their anal fin. They are mouthbrooders

Other Comments: There are several color morphs available for this species. Vegetation is very important in their diet for proper growth and coloration.

Temperature: 78: F
Max Size: 6 inches inches

 

Compressiceps Cichlid

(Dimidiochromis compressiceps)
Compressiceps Cichlid
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 70 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 7.8-8.5; KH 10-15
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 10"
Color Form: Orange, Silver
Temperament: Aggressive
Diet:  Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Africa - Lake Malawi
Family: Cichlidae

The Compressiceps, an African Cichlid, is currently classified as Dimidiochromis compressiceps. It was formerly known as Haplochromis compressiceps, and is endemic to the waters of Lake Malawi. It may also be listed under the genera Paratilapia, Haplochromis and Cyrtocara. Often referred to as the Malawi Eye-biter, it is the only known predator to eat its prey tail first. It has also been observed biting the eyes out of other fish prior to devouring them, hence its common name.

The Compressiceps requires a tank as large as possible, but a minimum of 70 gallons is required, and it should be densely planted along the tank's perimeter with Vallisneria or similar reedy plants. Include a deep, sandy bottom, numerous rocks for hiding, and good filtration.

The Compressiceps is a mouth brooder. Most members of the mouth brooding variety of African Cichlids are easily bred while in the aquarium, if given the proper aquarium set-up and water conditions. A small group of 5 to 7 females and one male will provide the optimal breeding opportunities.

The Compressiceps requires a diet of live or frozen meaty foods, or a good quality flake or pellet food designed for African Cichlids.

Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Perciformes (perch-like fish)
Family: Cichlidae
Scientific Name: Dimidiochromis compressiceps
Other Scientific Name(s): Paratilapia compressiceps, Haplochromis compressiceps, Cyrtocara compressiceps
Common Name: Malawi Eye-Biter
Other Common Names: Malawi eyebiter
Distribution: Pacific Ocean: Japan and Samoa. Reported from Fiji and Tuvalu (Ref. 12596); Chesterfield Is. (Ref. 11897).
Diet: Malawi Eye Biter is a highly aggresive fish . They like to hunt and stalk their prey before devouring it.
Temperament: They like to fight other fish and will fight over terrortory espesially if their are caves or weed they can hide in .

Other Comments: I think that this particular fish is an excellant species and are a lot of fun when they are grown up.

Min. Tank Size: 100 gallons
Temperature: 78-84 F
pH: 8.0
Max Size: 10 inches

Venustus Cichlid

(Nimbochromis venustus)
Venustus Cichlid
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 125 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 7.8-8.5; KH 10-15
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 10"
Color Form: Blue, Silver
Temperament: Aggressive
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Africa - Lake Malawi
Family: Cichlidae

The Venustus Cichlid (meaning refined or elegant) is a large cichlid with the male having a blue face with yellow markings across the head and dorsal fin. The female is less colorful with a silver background behind a dark blotched pattern.

The Venustus Cichlid requires a large aquarium with plenty of caves, hiding spots and places to set up territories. The ideal aquarium setup will consist of many pieces of stacked rock with a sandy aragonite based substrate which is needed to maintain the necessary high pH and alkalinity. These cichlids are very sensitive to levels of nitrates and therefore regular water changes will be needed for their optimal health.

The female will spawn on a flat rock, and will take the unfertilized eggs into her mouth and follow closely behind the male until he releases the sperm to fertilize the eggs. The female will then incubate the eggs for approximately three weeks before releasing the fry. The fry can then be fed newly hatched brine shrimp, daphnia, or crushed flake food.

The Venustus Cichlid needs meaty foods such as brine shrimp, bloodworms, small fish, as well as a quality flake or pellet food containing vegetable matter.

Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Perciformes (perch-like fish)
Family: Cichlidae
Scientific Name: Nimbochromis venustus
Other Scientific Name(s): Haplochromis venustus, Cyrtocara venusta, Haplochromis simulans
Common Name: Benustus Hap
Distribution: Western Pacific: Papua New Guinea (Ref. 6993) and New Zealand (Ref. 5755). Eastern Pacific: southern British Columbia, Canada to California, USA and farther south (Ref. 2850).
Diet: flake or ciclidsticks ,pellets, frozen or livefood is very welcome
Temperament: territorial fish and also agressive to females of their own species
Breeding:

I had succes with a fairly young coppel,if your water is in a good condition, in a 90 gallon tank and did nothing special. So if the fish is feeling happy it will probably breed.

Other Comments: Not a difficult fish to keep and breed but its on best in a 120 gallon tank with several(2/3) females.

Min. Tank Size: 90 gallons
Temperature: 70-80 F
pH: 8.5/9
Max Size: 8 inches

Electric Blue Cichlid

(Sciaenochromis ahli)
  Click here for a larger image
Electric Blue Cichlid
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 70 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 7.8-8.5; KH 10-15
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 8"
Color Form: Blue
Temperament: Aggressive
Diet:  Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised, USA
Family: Cichlidae

The Electric Blue African Cichlid, also called the Electric Blue Ahli, is a fairly typical member of the Cichlidae family. Interestingly, S. ahli was first imported erroneously as Haplochromis jacksoni; however, the two species are markedly different.

The Electric Blue African Cichlid does well with other Lake Malawi cichlids when provided with a spacious, rocky tank of 70 gallons or more. Although plants are extraneous for the Electric Blue African Cichlid, they may be beneficial for other tank members; however, fish larger than three inches will often uproot live plants. The Electric Blue African Cichlid can and probably will be aggressive toward smaller fish.

Considered a specialized mouth brooder, eggs are fertilized and carried by the female. Within 12 to 18 days, fry are released, measuring 1/4 inch. Once released, they do not return to their mother again. Most members of the mouth brooding variety of African Cichlids are easily bred while in the aquarium when given the proper tank set-up and excellent water conditions. A small group of 5 to 7 females and one male will provide the best opportunities for breeding.

The Electric Blue Cichlid needs both meaty foods and greens such as brine shrimp, blood worms, small fish as well as a quality flake or pellet food containing vegetable matter.

Common Name: Electric Blue Haplo
Other Common Names: Electric blue hap
Distribution: Southern Africa: Widespread in southern Africa from the Zambian Congo system and the Cunene, Okavango, and Zambezi south to the Phongolo. Absent from lower Zambezi, Buzi, Pungwe, and Save systems.
Diet: live guppies, feeder goldfish, and other small minnows, flake food for ciclids,or the pellet type food, tubifex worms and bloodworms are good as treat and to supplement diet.
Temperament: this is an aggressive fish, that does not like other ciclids of the same color. the electric blue or other blue fish. they will not stay in a tank with central American ciclids. have had other ciclids with other colors ex. yellow labs, burtons, brichardies.

Breeding: prolific breeders in the right environment, mouth brooders,that take care of there young until they are able to hide on there own. they will also eat there own once the female has released them. they prefer clean water with a ph of 8.2 and a temp. of about 82 degrees farenheit. add one tablespoon of aquarium salt to every five gallons of water. allow rocks to lay flat for a breeding surface. and two female for every male, the male and female during mating will bite fins and run each other aroound in the tank this is normal during breeding.

Other Comments: this is a fairly easy type of fish to take care of. they are a fairly clean fish, and require very little maintenance. they are a hardy fish. the males are a bright electric blue with a white stripe traveling from the nose to the tail, with yellow highlights to the bottom fins, and the tail. the females are brown in color with black fins and reach a lenght of about seven in.

Min. Tank Size: 35 gallons
Temperature: 82 F
pH: 8.2
Max Size: 10" inches

 

Kribensis Cichlid

(Pelvicachromis pulcher)
Kribensis Cichlid
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 50 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 6.0-8.0; KH 10-20
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 4"
Color Form: Black, Red, Yellow
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised
Family: Cichlidae

The Kribensis Cichlid, which originated from Western Africa is tank-raised and is one of the easier African Cichlids to breed. They have an elongated shape and are black in color with a yellow stripe and red belly. The belly takes on a more vivid red coloration during times of breeding. This is one of the smaller African Cichlids, and is often referred to as a dwarf Cichlid.

The Kribensis Cichlid is ideally kept in a 50-gallon or larger aquarium decorated with plenty of rocks and caves in order to provide adequate hiding places for these territorial fish.

Male Kribensis, whether full coloration or albino, are often more attracted to the albino female because of the intense red that the albino female displays during breeding. They are a substrate spawning species, and will clear an area within the substrate in order to spawn. Feed the fry baby brine shrimp and finely ground flake food.

The Kribensis should be given a diet containing mostly vegetable-based foods, supplemented with meaty type foods. Feed with a quality vegetable-based flake food, algae, and other foods designed for African Cichlids.

Buttikoferi Cichlid

(Tilapia butterkofferi)
Buttikoferi Cichlid
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 70 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 7.8-8.5; KH 10-15
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 1'
Color Form: Black, White
Temperament: Aggressive
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised
Family: Cichlidae

The Buttikoferi Cichlid, also known as the Zebra Tilapia, inhabits the river systems of Western Africa. The coloration of this fish is a series of black and white vertical stripes. Although they can be peaceful when young, as they grow so does their disposition, which becomes very territorial.

The ideal setup for the Buttikoferi Cichlid is a tank of at least 70 gallons with plenty of rocks for territories and a medium-sized gravel planted with hardy plants. This fish will become aggressive towards smaller fish, so it is important to keep them with similar-sized fish, or in a species tank.

Currently, the Buttikoferi Cichlid is being successfully bred in farms and aquariums. They are substrate spawners, excavating a pit to lay eggs in. During spawning time, the pair will become highly aggressive.

Feed the Buttikoferi Cichlid a variety of both meaty and vegetable-based foods. Live foods should be offered such as brine shrimp, earthworms and mosquito larvae. A quality flake and tablet food containing vegetable matter should also be included in their diet.

Albino Kribensis Cichlid

(Pelvicachromis pulcher)
Albino Kribensis Cichlid
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 50 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 6.0-8.0; KH 10-20
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 4"
Color Form: Pink, Red
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised
Family: Cichlidae

The Albino Kribensis Cichlid has been selectively bred from the Kribensis Cichlid and it originated from Western Africa. They are pink in color and the females gain a red belly during times of spawning. This is one of the smaller African Cichlids, and is often referred to as a dwarf Cichlid.

The Albino Kribensis Cichlid is ideally kept in a 50-gallon or larger aquarium decorated with plenty of rocks and caves in order to provide adequate hiding places for these territorial fish.

Male Kribensis, whether full coloration or albino, are often more attracted to the albino female because of the intense red that the albino female displays during breeding. They are a substrate spawning species, and will clear an area within the substrate in order to spawn. Feed the fry baby brine shrimp and finely ground flake food.

The Albino Kribensis should be given a diet containing mostly vegetable-based foods, supplemented with meaty type foods. Feed with a quality vegetable-based flake food, algae, and other foods designed for African Cichlids.

Buffalo Head Cichlid

(Steatocranus casuarius)
  Click here for a larger image
Buffalo Head Cichlid
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 6.0-8.0; KH 3-15
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 4"
Color Form: Black, Blue, Gray, Tan
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: West Africa
Family: Cichlidae

The Buffalo Head Cichlid is also known as the Lionhead or Blockhead Cichlid, and originates within the Congo River basin, Africa. They inhabit the swift waters of the Congo River and have developed a very "jerky" style of swimming which is similar to a goby. The Buffalo Head is a peaceful cichlid that will attain a maximum size of about 4 inches. They are camouflaged in black, blue, gray and tan colors and the male of this species will attain a large hump on the head with age.

The ideal setup for the Buffalo Head Cichlid is an aquarium of at least 30 gallons with plenty of rocks for territories and a medium-sized gravel planted with hardy plants. They will thrive in a wide range of pH, with a neutral pH of 7.0 being ideal. The Buffalo Head Cichlids are generally a passive fish if given plenty of space for territories and for breeding.

It is best when trying to breed the Buffalo Head Cichlid to incorporate 3 or 4 individuals into an aquarium with plenty of rocks and water current. In time, a pair will form and they will seclude and become aggressive towards the others of the group. Unless the aquarium is very large, it is best to remove the other Buffalo Heads from the aquarium. When the pair reaches sexual maturity of 2 to 3 inches, they will dig a den underneath a rock where they will spawn. After about 1 week, the fry will hatch and will be free-swimming within a few days after that. Feed the fry crushed flake food and baby brine shrimp. The Buffalo Head Cichlids are very excellent parents that will watch after the fry until their next brood. These Cichlid pairs bond for life and it is unusual for one of the two to form another pair in the event of a loss.

Feed the Buffalo Head Cichlid a variety of both meaty and vegetable-based foods. Frozen brine and mysis shrimp as well as a quality flake and tablet food containing vegetable matter should be the staple of their diet.

Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Perciformes (perch-like fish)
Family: Cichlidae
Scientific Name: Steatocranus casuarius
Other Scientific Name(s): Steatocranus casuarinus
Common Name: Lionhead Cichlid
Other Common Names: Lionhead cichlid
Distribution: Eastern Atlantic: southern Ireland to Angola; penetrated the Straits of Gibraltar without establishing widespread or abundant populations in the Mediterranean Sea. Reported from the Canary Is., Sicily and Corsica.
Diet: will accept all matter of dried and live food but adult fish prefere sinking pellets
Temperament: can be very quarrelsome with little damage to each other. usally a game of whos boss between males
Sexing:
Breeding: temp-77-79 f ph 7-7.5 must have caves or retreats of some kind to spawn in. does not show great parental care which is typical of cichlids.

Other Comments: needs to to be housed in a long shallow tank with powerfull filtration for movment of the water. rounded pebbles of different sizes to simulate a flowing river bed . can be kept in comunity with agresive sucking loaches and surface dwelling fish who like the movment of the water whom the bottom dwelling steatocranus will leave alone. given the correct micro habitat a very interesting cichlid .
Min. Tank Size: 45 gallons
Temperature: 77 F
pH: 7-7.5
Max Size: 4-5 inches males inches

Nanochromis Cichlid

(Nannochromis sp.)
Nanochromis Cichlid
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-77F; pH 6.5-7.5; KH 1-5
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 4"
Color Form: Black, White, Yellow
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Africa - Lake Mai-Ndombe
Family: Cichlidae

The Nanochromis Cichlid is from the murky waters of Lake Mai-Ndombe, Africa. The female of this species is the more colorful of the two and is mostly black with vertical white stripes. In times of breeding, the female will also gain a red coloration on the underbelly area.

The ideal setup for the Nanochromis is an aquarium of at least 30 gallons with plenty of plants, rocks, and driftwood for setting up territories and hiding. Unlike other African Cichlids, these fish prefer an acidic pH and a low, general hardness. Tank mates should be of similar size and disposition, and have similar water requirements.

The Nanochromis will dig caves in the substrate and under objects in the aquarium for spawning. Therefore, it is important to secure all heavy objects in the aquarium to prevent them from falling when the substrate is burrowed into. The female will deposit the eggs deep in the cave where the male will fertilize them. The fry will become waterborne in approximately 5 days, at which time, they should be fed baby brine shrimp and other suitable small foods.

The Nanochromis should be fed a variety of meaty foods with occasional vegetable-based foods. Bloodworms, daphnia, tubifex, brine shrimp, and a quality flake food including vegetable matter is a suitable diet.

Orange Leleupi Cichlid

(Neolamprologus leleupi)
Orange Leleupi Cichlid
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 7.8-9.0; KH 12-20
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 4"
Color Form: Black, Blue, Orange
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Diet:  Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised
Family: Cichlidae

The Orange Neolamprologus Leleupi Cichlid originates from the rocky coastal waters of Southern Lake Tanganyika, Africa. This species is one of the smaller of the cichlids, only attaining a maximum size of 4 inches. They have an elongated body shape, and are mostly orange in color. The mouth of these fish is surprisingly large for their size, and may be outlined in black or blue.

The Orange Neolamprologus Leleupi Cichlid should be maintained in an aquarium of at least 30 gallons with other smaller Tanganyikan cichlids. Incorporate plenty of rocks, shells and African driftwood in order to build caves. Provide a sandy bottom of white aragonite to maintain the necessary high pH and alkalinity, and to maintain their bright coloration. Darker substrates will cause these fish to darken.

The Orange Neolamprologus Leleupi Cichlid is a secretive cave spawner, and breeding is more difficult than most of the cichlids. This is a very slow growing species which may take a few years to reach sexual maturity. At that time, the males are typically larger than the females, attaining a size of about 4" compared to 3" with females. Provide a number of caves for the pair to choose from. Once an acceptable site is found, the female will lay her eggs within the cave, and the male will fertilize them. Incubation occurs in 3 to 4 days. They are typically very good parents until they spawn again. To increase their survival rates, relocate the young to a separate aquarium once breeding activities between the parents are noticed. Feed the fry newly hatched brine shrimp and finely crushed flake food.

Their diet should contain meaty items such as blood worms, brine and mysis shrimp, carnivore flake and pellet foods.

Dickfeldi Cichlid

(Julidochromis dickfeldi)
Dickfeldi Cichlid
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 8.0-9.0; KH 10-20
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 3"
Color Form: Black and White, Bright Blue
Temperament: Aggressive
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised
Family: Cichlidae

The Julido Dickfeldi Cichlid is a tank-raised species which originates from the rocky shorelines of the South Western part of Lake Tanganyika, Africa. They have an elongated body with alternating white and black thick stripes. Their fins are outlined and contain many spots of a semitransparent electric blue color which adds to the appeal of these fish.

The Julido Dickfeldi Cichlid is ideally kept in a 30-gallon or larger aquarium decorated with plenty of rocks and caves in order to provide adequate hiding places for these territorial fish. They prefer hard water with an alkalinity of 10 to 20 dKH and a pH of 8.0 to 9.0. In order to maintain these conditions, it is best to provide a substrate consisting of aragonite. The aragonite substrate can be mixed with darker gravel to reduce glare from the lighting.

Julido Dickfeldi Cichlids are relatively easy to breed. It is best to incorporate 6 or 8 of this species in the aquarium to allow them to pair off. They will begin to pair once they have reached the age of about 1 year. They are a cave spawning species, and will disappear for a few days in which time they lay their eggs upon the side or ceiling of the cave. Feed the fry baby brine shrimp and finely ground flake food.

The Julido Dickfeldi Cichlid should be given a diet containing mostly vegetable-based foods, supplemented with meaty type foods. Feed with a quality vegetable-based flake food, algae, and other foods designed for African Cichlids.

Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Perciformes (perch-like fish)
Family: Cichlidae
Scientific Name: Julidochromis dickfeldi
Common Name: Brown Julie
Distribution: Indo-West Pacific: Red Sea and East Africa to the Western Pacific.
Diet: Carnivorous. Small live and frozen foods; will take flake foods.
Temperament: Keep this species as a small group in a tank with plenty of hiding places and space for males to stake territories.

Breeding: Egg-depositor. Females can be larger than males, but sexing is difficult; allow the fish to pair themselves. To prevent interbreeding, do not keep this fish with other Julidochromis species. Although the pair defend a territory, they do not attend greatly to their fry beyond guarding them for some time in a rearing pit.

Comments:

The aquarium should be filled with rockwork reaching nearly to the water surface; in the wild, the Brown Julie spends much of its time in and around rock piles.

Min. Tank Size: 20 gallons
Temperature: 75 - 79 F
pH: 8.0 - 8.5
Max Size: 3 inches

Brevis Cichlid

(Neolamprologus brevis)
Brevis Cichlid
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-78F; pH 7.8-9.0; KH 12-20
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 2"
Color Form: Brown, Tan
Temperament: Aggressive
Diet:  Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised
Family: Cichlidae

The Neolamprologus Brevis Cichlid originates from the rocky coastal waters of Lake Tanganyika, Africa. This species is much smaller, only attaining a maximum size of 2-1/2 inches. They are one of the few shell dwelling species in which the male and female will share the same shell. Their bodies are elongated in shape and is brown in color with numerous vertical tan stripes

The Neolamprologus Brevis Cichlid should be maintained in an aquarium of at least 30-gallons with other smaller Tanganyikan cichlids. Incorporate plenty of rocks, shells and African driftwood in order to build caves. Provide a sandy bottom comprised of aragonite to maintain the necessary high pH and alkalinity.

The Neolamprologus Brevis Cichlid is a shell spawner, and breeding is more difficult than most of the cichlids. At maturity, the males are typically larger than the females. Provide plenty empty shells for the female to lay their eggs. Incubation occurs in 3 to 4 days. This is one of the few species in which the parents will not protect the young after hatching. To increase their survival rates, relocate the young to a separate aquarium after hatching. Feed the fry newly hatched brine shrimp and finely crushed flake food.

Their diet should contain meaty items such as; blood worms, brine and mysis shrimp, carnivore flake and pellet foods.

Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Perciformes (perch-like fish)
Family: Cichlidae
Scientific Name: Neolamprologus brevis
Other Scientific Name(s): Lamprologus brevis, Neolamprologus calliurus, Lamprologus calliurus, Lamprologus ocellatus, Lamprologus taeniurus
Common Name: Brevis Shell-Dweller
Distribution: Indo-West Pacific: Red Sea and East Africa to the Western Pacific.
Diet: Carnivorous. Small live or frozen foods such as Daphnia and bloodworm distinctly preferred, but will also accept flake foods.
Temperament: A pair will defend a territory up to 8 inches in diameter; if keeping more than one pair, ensure there is sufficient substrate area for each territory.
Sexing:
Breeding: This cichlid partially buries the shell of a Neothauma snail at an angle in the snad and uses them as a spawning site. Males are larger than females and have a yellow-orange edge to the dorsal fin. The female spawns in the shell, while the male, too big to enter the shell, releases his milt above it; this drifts down, fertilizing the eggs. Broods are small; on average, 20 fry may be produced.

Min. Tank Size: 10 gallons
Temperature: 75 - 79 F
pH: 8.0 - 8.5
Max Size: 2 inches

Marlieri Cichlid

(Julidochromis marlieri)
Marlieri Cichlid
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 8.0-9.0; KH 10-20
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 3"
Color Form: Black and White, Bright Blue
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised
Family: Cichlidae

The Julido Marlieri Cichlid is a tank-raised species which originates from the rocky shorelines of Lake Tanganyika, Africa. They have an elongated body with alternating white and black spots and stripes. Other than the yellow pectoral fins, their fins are outlined in both black, and a semitransparent electric blue color which adds to the appeal of these fish.

The Julido Marlieri Cichlid is ideally kept in a 30-gallon or larger aquarium decorated with plenty of rocks and caves in order to provide adequate hiding places for these territorial fish. They prefer hard water with an alkalinity of 10 to 20 dKH and a pH of 8.0 to 9.0. In order to maintain these conditions, it is best to provide a substrate consisting of aragonite. The aragonite substrate can be mixed with darker gravel to reduce glare from the lighting.

Julido Marlieri Cichlids are relatively easy to breed. It is best to incorporate 6 or 8 of this species in the aquarium to allow them to pair off. They will begin to pair once they have reached the age of about 1 year. They are a cave spawning species, and will disappear for a few days in which time they lay their eggs upon the side or ceiling of the cave. Feed the fry baby brine shrimp and finely ground flake food.

The Julido Marlieri Cichlid should be given a diet containing mostly vegetable-based foods, supplemented with meaty type foods. Feed with a quality vegetable-based flake food, algae, and other foods designed for African Cichlids.

Duboisi Cichlid

(Tropheus duboisii)
Duboisi Cichlid
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 50 gallons
Care Level: Moderate
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 7.8-9.0; KH 12-20
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 5"
Color Form: Black, Blue, White Markings, Yellow
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Diet:  Herbivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised
Family: Cichlidae

The Tropheus Duboisi Cichlid originates from the rocky coastal waters of Northern Lake Tanganyika, Africa. They are a beautiful species and are completely black as a juvenile with many white spots. As they mature, the spots fade and their head takes on a blue coloration. This variety of Tropheus Duboisi develops a wide yellow band just behind the pectoral fins. Like other species in the Tropheus genus, they are extremely aggressive towards their own kind, and should be housed in large groups of 6 or more. They are a very personable fish that do best in a species specific aquarium.

The Tropheus Duboisi Cichlid should be maintained in an aquarium of at least 50 gallons, in a large number of the same species, or with other smaller semi-aggressive Tanganyikan or Malawian cichlids. Incorporate plenty of rocks and African driftwood in order to build caves. Provide a sandy bottom of aragonite to maintain the necessary high pH and alkalinity.

The Tropheus Duboisi Cichlid is a mouth brooder, and breeding is more difficult than most of the cichlids. This is a very slow growing species which may take a few years to reach sexual maturity. At that time, the males are typically larger than the females, and have a more turned up nose. To increase the chance of spawning, house 5 or 6 females with one male. Provide a number of caves for the pair to choose from, and to reduce aggression. Incubation occurs in about 28 days. Feed the fry finely crushed flake food for the first few months until they become interested in lettuce or seaweed.

Their diet should be high in vegetable matter. Offer dried seaweed or romaine lettuce on a feeding clip daily, and supplement their diet with a quality vegetable based flake or pellet food.

Calvus Cichlid

(Altolamprologus calvus)
Calvus Cichlid
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Moderate
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 7.8-9.0; KH 12-20
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 5"
Color Form: Black, White Markings
Temperament: Aggressive
Diet:  Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised
Family: Cichlidae

The Calvus Cichlid originates from the Southwestern rocky coastal waters of Lake Tanganyika, Africa. This species is very slow growing, taking over 6 months to reach an inch and a half long, and over two years to reach sexual maturity. Their bodies are very thin and compact and are dark black in color with many small white spots. Their sloping forehead and large mouth gives them a menacing look.

The Calvus Cichlid should be maintained in an aquarium of at least 30 gallons if in a species aquarium, and a larger aquarium if maintained with other smaller Tanganyikan cichlids. Incorporate plenty of rocks, shells and African or other type of driftwood that will not alter pH. Provide a sandy bottom comprised of aragonite to maintain the necessary high pH and alkalinity.

The Calvus Cichlid is a shell spawner, and breeding is more difficult than most of the cichlids. This is a very slow growing species which may take a few years to reach sexual maturity. At that time, the males are typically larger than the females. Provide plenty empty shells for the female to lay their eggs. Incubation occurs in 3 to 4 days. To increase their survival rates, relocate the young to a separate aquarium after hatching. Feed the fry newly hatched brine shrimp and finely crushed flake food.

Their diet should contain meaty items such as blood worms, brine and mysis shrimp, carnivore flake and pellet foods.

Tretocephalus Cichlid

(Lamprologus tretacephaleus)
Tretocephalus Cichlid
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 50 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 7.8-9.0; KH 12-20
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 6"
Color Form: Brown, White
Temperament: Aggressive
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Africa - Lake Tanganyika
Family: Cichlidae

The Tretocephalus Cichlid, also known as the Five-bar Cichlid, comes from the coastal waters of Lake Tanganyika, Africa. The appearance of the Tretocephalus is similar to that of the Frontosa, but has only 5 stripes.

The Tretocephalus should be maintained in an aquarium of at least 50 gallons with other aggressive cichlids. Provide plenty of rocks with caves, and a sandy bottom comprised of aragonite to maintain the necessary high pH and alkalinity, and provide room to set up territories.

The Tretocephalus is a cave spawner, and breeding is more difficult than most of the cichlids. Provide plenty of caves with sandy bottoms for the female to lay their eggs. Incubation occurs in 3 to 4 days and the female will remain to protect the young. Feed the fry newly hatched brine shrimp and finely crushed flake food.

Their diet should contain both meaty and vegetable based foods such as brine shrimp, bloodworms, Spirulina-based flake and pellet foods.

Caudopunctatus Cichlid

(Neolamprologus caudopunctatus)
Caudopunctatus Cichlid
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 7.8-9.0; KH 12-20
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 3"
Color Form: Blue, Silver, Tan, Yellow
Temperament: Aggressive
Diet:  Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised
Family: Cichlidae

The Lamprologus Caudopunctatus Cichlid, also called the Neolamprologus Caudopunctatus Cichlid, originates from the rocky Zambian coastal waters of Lake Tanganyika, Africa. This species is one of the smaller of the cichlids, only attaining a maximum size of 3-1/2 inches. Their bodies are silver in color with a tan hue, and the dorsal and anal fins are very colorful with blue and yellow outlines and spots giving these fish a more dramatic look.

The Lamprologus Caudopunctatus Cichlid should be maintained in an aquarium of at least 30 gallons with other smaller Tanganyikan cichlids. Incorporate plenty of rocks, shells and African driftwood in order to build caves. Provide a sandy bottom comprised of aragonite to maintain the necessary high pH and alkalinity, and for breeding purposes.

The Lamprologus Caudopunctatus Cichlid is a substrate spawner, and breeding is more difficult than most of the cichlids. This is a very slow growing species which may take a few years to reach sexual maturity. At that time, the males are typically larger than the females, attaining a size of about 3-1/2" compared to 2-1/2" with females. Provide a few inches of sand, and plenty empty shells for the female to lay their eggs. They are typically a substrate spawner; but also may lay their eggs within a shell. Incubation occurs in 3 to 4 days. To increase their survival rates, relocate the young to a separate aquarium after hatching. Feed the fry newly hatched brine shrimp and finely crushed flake food.

Their diet should contain meaty items such as blood worms, brine and mysis shrimp, carnivore flake and pellet foods.

Cylindricus Cichlid

(Neolamprologus cylyndricus)
Cylindricus Cichlid
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 7.8-9.0; KH 12-20
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 4"
Color Form: Dark, Silver
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Diet:  Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised
Family: Cichlidae

The Neolamprologus Cylindricus Cichlid originates from the rocky coastal waters of Southeastern Lake Tanganyika, Africa. This species is one of the smaller of the cichlids, only attaining a maximum size of 4 inches. They have an elongated body, and are silver in color with many dark vertical bands. Their fins are outlined in an iridescent blue which adds to the appeal of these fish.

The Neolamprologus Cylindricus Cichlid should be maintained in an aquarium of at least 30 gallons with other smaller Tanganyikan cichlids. They are aggressive towards co specifics, and should not be included with other Neolamprologus cichlids. Incorporate plenty of rocks, shells and African driftwood in order to build caves. Provide a sandy bottom of aragonite to maintain the necessary high pH and alkalinity.

The Neolamprologus Cylindricus Cichlid is a secretive cave spawner, and breeding is more difficult than most of the cichlids. This is a very slow growing species which may take a few years to reach sexual maturity. At that time, the males are typically larger than the females, attaining a size of about 4" compared to 3" with females. Provide a number of caves for the pair to choose from. Once an acceptable site is found, the female will lay her eggs within the cave, and the male will fertilize them. Incubation occurs in 3 to 4 days. Feed the fry newly hatched brine shrimp and finely crushed flake food.

Their diet should contain meaty items such as blood worms, brine and mysis shrimp, carnivore flake and pellet foods.

Albino Ornatus Cichlid

(Julidochromis ornatus)
Albino Ornatus Cichlid
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-78F; pH 8.0-9.0; KH 10-20
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 3"
Color Form: White, Yellow
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised
Family: Cichlidae

The Albino Julido Ornatus Cichlid is a tank-raised variety of the Julidochromis Ornatus which originates from the rocky shorelines of Lake Tanganyika, Africa. They have an elongated body with alternating yellow and white thick stripes. Because they are an albino, they have the signature red eye. Their fins are outlined in a semitransparent electric blue color which adds to the appeal of these fish.

The Albino Julido Ornatus Cichlid is ideally kept in a 30-gallon or larger aquarium decorated with plenty of rocks and caves in order to provide adequate hiding places for these territorial fish. They prefer hard water with an alkalinity of 10 to 20 dKH and a pH of 8.0 to 9.0. In order to maintain these conditions, it is best to provide a substrate consisting of aragonite. The aragonite substrate can be mixed with darker gravel to reduce glare from the lighting.

Albino Julido Ornatus Cichlids are relatively easy to breed. It is best to incorporate 6 or 8 of this species in the aquarium to allow them to pair off. They are a substrate spawning species, and will clear an area within the substrate underneath a rock or wood in order to spawn. Feed the fry baby brine shrimp and finely ground flake food.

The Albino Julido Ornatus Cichlid should be given a diet containing mostly vegetable-based foods, supplemented with meaty type foods. Feed with a quality vegetable-based flake food, algae, and other foods designed for African Cichlids.

Julidochromis ornatus - Golden Julie

Photo Copyright: the_cichlid_cellar

Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Perciformes (perch-like fish)
Family: Cichlidae
Scientific Name: Julidochromis ornatus
Common Name: Golden Julie
Other Common Names: Golden julie
Distribution: Indo-West Pacific: Red Sea and East Africa to the Western Pacific.
Diet: Feed on both livefood and prepared food such as flake. Thier favourite food is worms, crustaceans, insects, plant matter and dried.
Temperament: Both male and female are aggresive and a species only tank is recommended with one male to several females.
Sexing:
Breeding: This is a territorial cichlid best kept as a single species to avoid male rivalry. the tank should be furnished with rocks, arranged to prvide small caves. The female lays eggs in a small cave and the male, which is larger than the female, takes the major part in brood protection. After hatching the fry remain at the spawning site for four to six days and are then free swimming. At this stage they can be fed on nauplii and other tiny live food. Sexing is difficult and can only be achieved when almost fully grown. Size being the only distinguishing feature. Although females may spawn small egg numbers, up to 50, they may well spawn more frequently than other cichlids.
Special Care:
Other Comments:

The Golden Julie is a relatively easy fish to keep and will breed easily if the conditins in the tank are kept ideal. They will protect their fry until they can more or less hold their own in a tank.

Species Stats
Min. Tank Size: 12 gallons
Temperature: 72 - 77F F
pH: 7.0-7.6
Max Size: 5 inches

 

 

Gold Head Compressicep Cichlid

(Altolamprologus compressicep)
Gold Head Compressicep Cichlid
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 50 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 7.8-9.0; KH 12-20
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 4"
Color Form: Black, Brown, Yellow
Temperament: Aggressive
Diet:  Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised
Family: Cichlidae

The Gold Head Compressicep Cichlid originates from the rocky coastal waters of Lake Tanganyika, Africa. This species is much smaller then their distant cousins, Dimidiochromis compressiceps, which originate in Lake Malawi, Africa; only attaining a maximum size of 4-1/2 inches. They are a very attractive cichlid with a yellow and black mask covering the head, and several vertical brown lines covering the body.

The Gold Head Compressicep Cichlid should be maintained in an aquarium of at least 50-gallons with other aggressive cichlids. Incorporate plenty of rocks and African driftwood in order to build caves, and a sandy bottom comprised of aragonite to maintain the necessary high pH and alkalinity.

The Gold Head Compressicep Cichlid is a cave spawner, and breeding is more difficult than most of the cichlids. At maturity, the males are typically deeper bodied and larger than the females. Provide plenty of caves, empty shells or even flower pots for the female to lay their eggs. Incubation occurs in 3 to 4 days and the female will remain to protect the spawning site. Feed the fry newly hatched brine shrimp and finely crushed flake food.

Their diet should contain both meaty and vegetable based foods such as brine shrimp, bloodworms, Spirulina-based flake and pellet foods.

Gold Ocellatus Cichlid

(Lamprologus ocellatus)
Gold Ocellatus Cichlid
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 7.8-9.0; KH 12-20
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 2"
Color Form: Gold, Metallic Blue
Temperament: Aggressive
Diet:  Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised
Family: Cichlidae

The Gold Lamprologus Ocellatus Cichlid originates from the rocky coastal waters of Lake Tanganyika, Africa. This species is one of the smaller of the cichlids, only attaining a maximum size of 2-1/2 inches. Their bodies are gold in color with a metallic blue hue, and the dorsal and anal fins are very large giving these fish a more dramatic look. They are commonly found within piles of shells in nature, in which they use to breed.

The Gold Lamprologus Ocellatus Cichlid should be maintained in an aquarium of at least 30 gallons with other smaller Tanganyikan cichlids. Incorporate plenty of rocks, shells and African driftwood in order to build caves. Provide a sandy bottom of aragonite to maintain the necessary high pH and alkalinity.

The Gold Lamprologus Ocellatus Cichlid is a shell spawner, and breeding is more difficult than most of the cichlids. This is a very slow growing species which may take a few years to reach sexual maturity. At that time, the males are typically larger than the females. Provide plenty empty shells for the female to lay their eggs. Incubation occurs in 3 to 4 days. To increase their survival rates, relocate the young to a separate aquarium after hatching. Feed the fry newly hatched brine shrimp and finely crushed flake food.

Their diet should contain meaty items such as blood worms, brine and mysis shrimp, carnivore flake and pellet foods.

Species Stats
Min. Tank Size: 20 gallons
Temperature: 79 F
pH: 8
Max Size:

2-3 inches

Diet: live foods of all sizes, fish fry, most dried foods.
Temperament: Keep only in pairs and never with other shelldweller species as these fish will kill them. Ok to keep in a specialised community if cichlids

Breeding: Breeds after vigorous courtship inside the females shell. Eggs take 24-32 hours to hatch and can fed on young brineshrimp straight away. The male only sees other fry as a threat and not his own.

Other Comments: These fish dont need a big tank and this sometimes may be dangerous for the females

 

Gold Sexfasciatus Cichlid

(Neolamprologus sexfasciatus)
Gold Sexfasciatus Cichlid
Quick Stats
Care Level: Easy
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 7.8-9.0; KH 12-20
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 6"
Color Form: Bright Blue, Gold
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Diet:  Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised
Family: Cichlidae

The Gold Neolamprologus Sexfasciatus Cichlid originates from the rocky coastal waters of Southern Lake Tanganyika, Africa. This species is one of the larger of the dwarf African cichlids, and attains a maximum size of 6 inches. They have an elongated body shape, and are gold in color with many dark vertical bands. Their fins are outlined in an iridescent blue which adds to the appeal of these fish.

The Gold Neolamprologus Sexfasciatus Cichlid should be maintained in an aquarium of at least 50 gallons with other smaller Tanganyikan or Malawian cichlids. Incorporate plenty of rocks, shells and African driftwood in order to build caves. Provide a sandy bottom of aragonite to maintain the necessary high pH and alkalinity.

The Gold Neolamprologus Sexfasciatus Cichlid is a secretive cave spawner, and breeding is more difficult than most of the cichlids. This is a very slow growing species which may take a few years to reach sexual maturity. At that time, the males are typically larger than the females, attaining a size of about 6" compared to 5" with females. Provide a number of caves for the pair to choose from. Once an acceptable site is found, the female will lay her eggs within the cave, and the male will fertilize them. It is recommended to remove all other fish from the aquarium once breeding has taken place. These fish become aggressive during breeding time. Incubation occurs in 3 to 4 days. Feed the fry newly hatched brine shrimp and finely crushed flake food.

Their diet should contain meaty items such as blood worms, brine and mysis shrimp, carnivore flake and pellet foods.

Moorii (Kaiser II) Cichlid

(Tropheus moorii)
Moorii (Kaiser II) Cichlid
Quick Stats
Care Level: Moderate
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 7.8-9.0; KH 12-20
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 6"
Color Form: Black, Yellow
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Diet:  Herbivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised
Family: Cichlidae

The Tropheus Moorii (Kaiser II) Cichlid originates from the rocky coastal waters of Lake Tanganyika, Africa. They are completely black except for a yellow vertical band that runs the entire width of the fish in the middle of their body. These fish have the amazing ability to hide this band when stressed. Like other species in the Tropheus genus, they are extremely aggressive towards their own kind, and should be housed in groups of 6 or more.

The Tropheus Moorii Cichlid should be maintained in an aquarium of at least 50 gallons, ideally in a large number of the same species, or with other smaller semi-aggressive Tanganyikan or Malawian cichlids. Incorporate plenty of rocks and African driftwood in order to build caves. Provide a sandy bottom of aragonite to maintain the necessary high pH and alkalinity.

The Tropheus Moorii Cichlid is a mouth brooder, and breeding is more difficult than most of the cichlids. This is a very slow growing species which may take a few years to reach sexual maturity. They are one of the more difficult species to determine the sex of. The males typically grow faster than the females and have a deeper body. To increase the chance of spawning, house 5 or 6 females with one male. Provide a number of caves for the pair to choose from, and to reduce aggression. Incubation occurs in about 28 days. Feed the fry finely crushed flake food for the first few months until they gain an interest in seaweed or lettuce.

Their diet should be high in vegetable matter. Offer dried seaweed or romaine lettuce on a feeding clip daily, and supplement their diet with a quality vegetable based flake or pellet food.

Frontosa Cichlid

(Cyphotilapia frontosa)
Frontosa Cichlid
Quick Stats
Minimum Tank Size: 70 gallons
Care Level: Moderate
Tank Conditions: 72-82F; pH 7.8-8.5; KH 10-15
Max. Size In Aquarium: Up to 1' 2"
Color Form: Brown, White
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Diet:  Carnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised, USA
Family: Cichlidae

The Frontosa African Cichlid is a fairly typical member of the Cichlidae family. Both sexes are characterized by a large frontal hump which will develop as the fish reaches maturity, or attains a length of around 4 inches.  It is known by the scientific name of Cyphotilapia frontosa, but may also be known as Paratilapia frontosa, and Pelmatochromis frontosus. Originating from the deep waters of Lake Tanganyika, Africa, wild-caught specimens are not seen as often as captive-bred specimens in the hobbyist's aquarium. In their native Africa, Frontosa African Cichlids are considered a delicacy on the table.

Although territorial, the Frontosa African Cichlid is generally not aggressive, but rather gentle and tolerant. It does well in a tank with plenty of rocks and caves for hiding and a sandy bottom. Plants are incidental but may be helpful for other tank mates.

A mouth brooder, eggs are laid in a rocky crevasse or cave and then scooped up by the female where she carries them for 21 to 28 days. Once released, she will take them back into her mouth at night or if danger is present. Most members of the mouth brooding variety of African Cichlids are easily bred while in the aquarium if given the proper tank set-up and excellent water conditions. A small group of 5 to 7 females and one male will provide the best opportunities for breeding.

The Frontosa African Cichlid prefers a diet of flaked and pellet foods and freeze-dried ocean plankton or krill.

Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Perciformes (perch-like fish)
Family: Cichlidae
Scientific Name: Cyphotilapia frontosa
Other Scientific Name(s): Paratilapia frontosa, Pelmatochromis frontosus, Cyphotilapia frontosus
Common Name: Frontosa Cichlid
Other Common Names: Humphead cichlid
Distribution: Indo-Pacific: East Africa to the Society and the Hawaiian islands.
Diet: This species gets along with almost all Malawi and Tangyikan cichlids. Slow growing and beautiful. They get very large and lose there brilliant color when they get old. They eat very slow. If you have fish that eat fast in a tank with a Frontosa the Frontosa will not grow that much. The Frontosa will eat everything but prefers plant based foods. Spirulina is a favorite.

Min. Tank Size: 55 gallons
Temperature: 80 F
pH: 8.0
Max Size: 10-12 inches

Cyrtocara moorii - Blue Dolphin Cichlid

Photo Copyright: malawi_cichlid_homepage

Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Perciformes (perch-like fish)
Family: Cichlidae
Scientific Name: Cyrtocara moorii
Other Scientific Name(s): Haplochromis moorii, Cyrtocara moorei, Haplochromis moori, Cyrtocara moori
Common Name: Blue Dolphin Cichlid
Other Common Names: Hump-head
Distribution: Asia, Oceania, and Western Pacific, from the Ryukyu Islands to New Caledonia.
Diet: Theeir diet should consist of oth meat and vegetable matter. You should probrobly feed them mainly flake food or soaked pellets. Once a week you could feed live or frozen brine shrimp or some chopped beefheart. DO NOT OVER FEED !!! may get bloated.
Breeding: Usually starts to breed after about two years of age. It could be done in a 50 gallon but you should breed in a bigger tank. They are mouth brooders so she takes the eggs straight into her mouth after she lays them. She usually lays about 50-100 eggs and with her first brood she would probrobly swallow the young. Once I stripped my female she spit the fry out all over the gravel and I had to get the fry from there. Usually before you even get the mother out the tank she would spit the fry out into the net.
Other Comments: This has been one of my favorite fish to raise if your a starter with african cichlids and planning to get bigger aquariums I would really recomend these fish !!!

Archocentrus sajica (Sajica Cichlid)
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Perciformes (perch-like fish)
Family: Cichlidae
Scientific Name: Archocentrus sajica
Other Scientific Name(s): Cichlasoma sajica
Common Name: Sajica Cichlid
Distribution: East Africa: Endemic to Lake Malawi.
Diet: They eat pretty much any prepared fish foo but should have an occasional high vegetable content food.
Temperament: Excellent for keeping with other Cichlids of similar size and habits or even with other fairly robust fish such as Pacu or Tinfoil Barbs. Can even be kept with larger Cichlids without being stressed or bullied. If kept as breeding pair it is best to keep them in a species tank of 20-30 gallons.
Sexing:
Breeding: Cave or rock spawner.
Special Care:
Other Comments: The scientific name given here, Archocentras sajica, is incorrect. The correct scientific name is Herichthys sajica.
 
Min. Tank Size: 20 gallons
Temperature: 70 - 80 degrees F
pH: 6.8 - 7.5
Max Size: 4 inches
 
Archocentrus sajica - Sajica Cichlid
 

Asprotilapia leptura (Purple Zambian Cichlid)
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Perciformes (perch-like fish)
Family: Cichlidae
Scientific Name: Asprotilapia leptura
Other Scientific Name(s): Asprotilapia leptula, Asprotilapia taeniurus
Common Name: Purple Zambian Cichlid
Distribution: Indo-West Pacific: southern Japan, South China Sea, Philippines, Indonesia, northwest shelf of Australia and Andaman Sea.
Diet: Basically algae eaters.
Temperament: Not widely kept by aquariasts, but is best in a species tank.
Sexing:
Breeding: Mouthbrooder. Female holds the eggs.
Min. Tank Size: 30 gallons
Temperature: 75 - 82 degrees F
pH: 7.2 - 7.8
Max Size: 5 inches
Asprotilapia leptura - Purple Zambian Cichlid

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